swpl

Pie 178: The Hibs Ladies Bridie (c/o Penicuik Athletic)

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Hello and welcome to Meat Filled Pastries, your home of Scottish football baking. It’s taken a wee while to get around to writing this next batch of reviews, so my apologies for that. I’m currently going through a glut of women’s football work and writing which is wonderful but is also keeping me very busy and hopefully your appetite was sated by my History of Pie and Bovril piece. People seemed to like that which was nice.

This review comes from Penicuik Park, normal home of East of Scotland Penicuik Athletic but, for one sodden August evening, also home to Hibernian Ladies as they took on Stirling University in the Scottish Women’d Cup. A 300+ crowd turned up for the game and with team sheets, kiosk and even a half time draw the game had a right “proper” feel to it.

I go back on forth on the entry requirements for SWPL football in Scotland, I think cover is necessary, but personally I can cope without seats, especially when sometimes the view and comfort of the seating is highly questionable *cough* Ravenscraig *cough*, and I think a more holistic view of fan experience sometimes needs to be taken into consideration. I’m writing these next three reviews whilst watching Chelsea v Spurs in the Women’s Super League and the level of coverage being afforded to the women’s game in England is something that Scotland has to find a way of grabbing on to. I continue to remain more hopeful, as opposed to expectant though.

One of the things that sometime’s leaves a little to be desired at women’s games is the catering so I was pleasantly surprised to see a fully stocked hut to make my dinner selection from. Having already had the Penicuik Athletic Pie some years ago I scanned the whiteboard before choosing myself a bridie and so, without much further ado, let’s rate some pie.

WherePenicuik Park, Hibernian Ladies 5-0 Stirling University, Scottish Women’s Cup 3rd Round

Price: At £1.50 this was very reasonably priced in the context of the non-league surroundings.

Presentation: This pie was handed to me wrapped in a double layer of circle-dimpled kitchen roll, more substantial than the standard white napkin which, of course, means that it was more than capable of doing the job required.

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Meatiness: I was ready to wax lyrically about this bridie, my natural inclination at present is to promote anything Scottish women’s football related to act as a counter to the many questions and observations that I have on a near game by game basis but, if I’m being honest, this bridie filling was just OK.

It was a little shy on quantity and what was there was needing a little extra crack of salt and pepper. It did the job but left me pining for something more.

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Pastry: The pastry was golden, aided by a brush of egg glaze before baking with the end result having the look more of an empanada than a bridie. It was really well baked on the outside and there was some flaking but as I peered inside, using the floodlights to guide me, I noticed there was a pretty raw looking layer of pastry. This will have hindered the balance, naturally dulling all the favours that it surrounded, and again whilst it was fine, it wasn’t one that was going to live long in the memory.

Brown Sauce: It probably could have done with a wee squirt of something but the bridie, in my opinion, is not a naturally condiment receptacle so none was used here.

Overall: It was all fine but the filling needed some added punch and to be more generous whilst the pastry was golden but also not quite right underneath.

Gravy Factor: Meh.

I don’t want this review to undermine the fantastic effort made by ‘Cuikie to host this midweek tie. They fully embraced the responsibility and also saw it as an opportunity to not only support women’s football but to also ensure that should Hibernian need a temporary home again then they would be first in line.

Next up is a special trip south of the border where I review the Workington AFC Steak Pie. However until next time, go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. Editor of Leading the Line, A member of the Scottish Women’s Football Media Team and a contributor to various football websites, podcasts and publications. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ and part-time Madrileno with a passion for food and football that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

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Pie 163: The Clyde Pie

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Welcome back to yet another edition of everyone’s favourite location for meat filled musings. This week I have myself the rare treat of getting to a review a pie for free, well kind of.

On Sunday 14th April Spartans took on Hibernian and Rangers took on Glasgow City at Broadwood in the SWPL Cup Semi Finals, as opposed to just turning up as a fan I was carrying out some duties as part of the SWPL Media Team creating some content and supporting with the running of the @ScotWFootball social media accounts. I’ve officially been involved for a couple of months now and it’s been interesting getting a view on the challenges often faced from the inside. A recent Scottish Supporters Network survey showed that of the 5,773 people surveyed only 1% (approx. 60 people) said they regularly attend women’s football. A complimentary question to this asked the reason for this apathy and I wanted to focus on the biggest two.

Knowing when and where the game was on (43% of respondents highlighted this as a reason for not attending)

As a long time supporter of women’s football I can sympathise greatly with this view point as in times past I have got to game day still unsure when and where a fixture would be. In this recent season though there has been massive strides made with the creation of an updated SWPL (Scottish Women’s Premier League) site as well as a refreshed Scottish Women’s Football website. The league have set up a partnership with the excellent Football Stadium Prints with the images he creates being used to promote every match day including date, time and location. On my part contextualising what these games mean and what kind of contest you can expect are equally important and so via the SWPL feed I now produce match cards giving this detail along with recent form, league positions and points to date. It’s getting better but the challenge is still there, a crowd of over 500 attended the two SWPL Cup Semi Finals combined, yet the Twitter following of the four competing sides alone is over 38,000 in number and converting those numbers into an increasing number of bums on seats is just one place where I think efforts should be focused.

Top Tips for Knowing when and where the Game is

  • Follow @SWPL and @ScotWFootball on Twitter
  • Visit the SWPL and Scottish Women’s Football websites

Better promotion from the media (39% of respondents highlighted this as a reason for not attending)

Currently as a result of the data provider used by the BBC to populate their feeds both SWPL fixtures and tables aren’t available on the BBC Sport Scotland website. It’s annoying but until the coverage and support for the game increases the incentive for these data providers to have this information available remains less than it would if there was millions of pounds at play. It’s a vicious cycle but one that again is improving.

BBC Alba provides regular live coverage of Friday night SWPL fixtures. Whether the scheduling of these against rival games could be better is a debate I could have for days but it is progress. The SWPL Media team is small in number but it is getting bigger and with that comes the opportunity for more coverage, more audio and more highlights. A subscription to The Scottish Women’s Football YouTube channel will not only give you access to match highlights but also provide with you post match reaction and coverage of cup draws amongst other things. There is also the recently launched Anyone’s Game Podcast devoted to Scottish Women’s football and I’d love to help get one set up for the league proper at some point. There is also a movement afoot to help heighten coverage of the game even further ahead of the national side’s World Cup farewell match against Jamaica at Hampden where a new record attendance will surely be obtained.

It’s not going to be easy, I along with many others, devotes hours of free time to help promote the game but for the moment you may still need to go looking for it just a little.

Top Tips for finding media relating to Scottish Women’s Football:

  • Subscribe to the Scottish Women’s Football YouTube Channel
  • Listen to the Anyone’s Game Podcast
  • Follow Leading the Line (I’ll be doing more women’s content as the men’s season comes to the end).

I make no apologies for using this forum to help promote the women’s game, it deserves the focus to last and to not just be a fleeting national notion with a World Cup on the horizon and I’ll continue to share what I can along the way but for now, let’s get back to the business of reviewing pies, and this scotch pie offering from Clyde FC.

So without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

Where: Broadwood Stadium, Spartans 0-3 Hibernian, Rangers 1-5 Glasgow City, SWPL Cup Semi Finals

Price: This Scotch Pie cost the equivalent of one full day’s work of manning the Scottish Women’s Football Social Media feeds. So if I put zero value on my time then this pie was indeed free. I very nearly didn’t get one in the media scramble but as the words you are reading can testify to, I did and I was glad because it would turn out to be both my breakfast and lunch that day.

Presentation: Mixed in with all the sandwiches on a plate in the media centre this pie came in a silver tin foil case, the kind of case that has housed pies across Scottish football for years now.

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Meatiness: Not one to wax lyrically about here, not that it was bad, in fact it was perfectly good. Nice level of spicing with a faint pepper kick in the background and with the texture you would want to find in a good scotch pie. It’s not going to see me rushing back to Broadwood for another but at the same time it didn’t leave my tastebuds disappointed either.

Pastry: Held well. Crispy edges, sufficient colour on it, did the job.

Brown Sauce: A tangy little sachet that added a zing to the overall eating experience.

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Overall: Absolutely nothing wrong with it but at the same time nothing that will have me champing at the bit to induct it into the Meat Filled Pastries Hall of Fame. These factors make for a pretty boring pie review but if you were to get hungry at Broadwood this pie would certainly do you no harm.

Gravy Factor: Standard Bisto.

Next up, I cross the border for some Good Friday fun where I take in Carlisle United vs Lincoln City in the League Two promotion race? However until next time, go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. A member of the SWPL Media Team and a contributor to various football websites and publications he also currently acts as Heart & Hand Podcast’s resident Iberian football expert, hosting “The Isco Inferno” a weekly take on all things Spanish football. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ and part-time Madrileno with a passion for food and football that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

In Search of the SWPL

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The second half of the Scottish Women’s season is about to get underway following the traditional midsummer break. Hibernian and Glasgow City sit head and shoulders above the rest with the Edinburgh side looking to end City’s 11 year run of domestic dominance. Both sides on 35 points with 11 wins and two draws to their names with an end of season showdown already feeling inevitable. I often attend women’s games, choosing real life entertainment against whatever Premier League fixture have cobbled together under the guise of “Super Sunday” but for many a stigma remains, one that dictates that the quality isn’t very good and that nobody really cares. But what’s the cause of this and is there a resolution to be found?

A first attempt to find a list of women’s fixtures instantly flags an issue. Whilst the Scottish Women’s Football (SWF) website is a reliable source, including regularly updated kick off times and locations across all senior women’s leagues it’s a resource that is only known to those that know. Google obviously helps but statistics dictate that your average fan is more than likely to head to one of the two behemoths of web/app based sports coverage in the UK, namely the BBC and Sky Sports. The problem is should you rely solely on these then your search for Scottish women’s fixtures will be ultimately fruitless.

This, along with coverage in general, been a constant source of bemusement to me for some time, with BBC Scotland particularly culpable such is their perceived lack of ability to cover the mere basics. A deficiency made even more stark when you look at the coverage the women’s game gets south of the border on the very same site. While an entire subsite is dedicated to the women’s game direct from the BBC Sport home page this is very much an England centric proposition. Here you can find latest news from the clubs, view fixtures and league tables. It would be remiss of me not to mention that Scottish football does feature but the aforementioned basics are nowhere to be found.

Then there is the Women’s Football Show a regularly scheduled look at the going on’s within the Women’s Super League (WSL) including match highlights and interviews with prominent figures. The Women’s FA Cup Final is now a key part of the BBC’s May Bank Holiday schedule, broadcast in full HD and with over 45,000 in attendance at this years final. It feels like a big deal. Meanwhile in Scotland fans are treated to BBC Alba and picture quality that would have raised cries of derision twenty years ago. At least you’ll get to brush up on your Gaelic. There will be some people who read this and automatically go into defence mode, how it’s not Scotland’s fault and how we are forever marginalised on a UK scale. There is a smidgen of merit in that, anybody who has lived in the south of England particular will have had at least one conversation about Scotland that has left you dumbfounded in its ignorance but are the people that should be held for account not those in charge of the BBC Sport Scotland mandate? Is it not their job to be that voice?

There is some evidence they are trying though, albeit in a near typical backwards fashion. During the World Cup a common consensus formed that Alex Scott – by taking the rare approach of combining enthusiasm and research to her football punditry brief – was a welcome addition to the coverage. Sportscene had already followed that path somewhat and have had current and former Scottish Women’s footballers appear on Sportscene and Radio Scotland to pass comment on frequent occasion although the coverage itself on these outlets can sometimes leave a lot to be desired. There is also, usually, a couple of articles buried on the Scottish Football section of the website giving a summary of the weekend’s action although it’s regular brevity leaves you wondering how much pressure is put on to produce high quality content. BBC Alba does at least play the game a little, not only showing the Scottish Cup Final but regular coverage of both international women’s football and the odd Glasgow City European adventure, though once again you do have to ask if this really is the best way to get new eyes on the game?

I’m not sure that the blame should be left solely at the BBC’s door though. Imagine if you will that you have somehow made your way to the SWF website and now find yourself looking at the upcoming Sunday’s fixtures. The likelihood is that you will already support a men’s side and so naturally you peruse the page looking for their female equivalent.

Unfortunately that doesn’t always work.

Let’s take this weekend for example. Not only is it the return of the women’s season but it is also kick off time for the SPFL. On Sunday, Aberdeen play Rangers in the stand out fixture of the weekend as Steven Gerrard makes his league debut away to one of the teams his side will be looking to overhaul. With a 1pm Sunday kick off to allow for TV coverage you would think that this would provide you the perfect opportunity to get yourself down to your first women’s match. Well, I’m sorry to report, you would be wrong. Whilst the seagulls at Pittodrie look on in hungry anticipation of that first flung pie in the SWPL Aberdeen travel to Dalkeith to take on Hearts at 2pm whilst Rangers travel to Station Park to take on Forfar Farmington. The kick off time there? 1pm. So I ask, as a fan with a stronger connection to the men’s side than women’s of one of these two sides, what choice are you most likely to make? For many it’s an easy decision.

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This isn’t confined to same club conflicts though and often top women’s games are forced to clash with the best that Scottish football offer. For example, the 2017 Scottish Women’s Cup Final was played at the same time as the men’s Scottish League Cup Final. I mean give yourselves a chance! Now there’s reasons for this, pitch availability I have seen often cited but when the SWPL, and in turn the SFA, don’t make the game a priority how can they expect a fan too?

Irrespective of the challenges above you’ve thrown caution to the wind and picked a fixture, the next thing you need to know is where you need to go. Most women’s clubs will have somewhere that they call “home”. Teams with affiliations to their male counterparts will often ground share such as Forfar Farmington (Station Park) and St. Johnstone (McDiarmid Park). Some clubs will host their women’s fixtures at local junior or lower league ground such as Rangers at New Tinto Park just a ten minute walk from Ibrox and Hibernian at Ainslie Park home of Lowland League Spartans. The recurring theme, and by association the problem, is that while these teams will have a “home” none of them are a place that they could call their own and so on occasion they have to go on the move. Where they move to though is often telling of the challenges the women’s game in Scotland faces.

Let’s take a look at the 3rd Round of the SSE Scottish Women’s Cup. Scottish women’s football most successful club and current SWPL champions Glasgow City host league counterparts Stirling University. The dominant force in Scottish women’s football for well over a decade have been most recently based out of Petershill Park in the north of the city. For this tie, arguably the pick of the round, they find themselves based at St. Mungo’s Academy, a school linked sports complex close to their spiritual home. They’re not the only ones though, Hearts usually based from Kings Park, home of Dalkeith Thistle, host Spartans at Glencorse Community Centre. It’s hard for critics to take the women’s game seriously when you’re watching teams being hurried off the park because the local men’s amateur game is next up.

So you’ve managed to find a fixture, you’ve mapped your path there and triple checked the kick off time. You walk up to the venue and find yourself wondering just what should you expect from your first women’s football experience? The honest answer is pretty much anything.

Much like at any level or grade of football the quality of play in show could be anything from utterly mundane to totally ludicrous with the majority falling somewhere in between. For example, a Scottish Cup tie between Blackburn United and Ayr United that I attended earlier in the season finished 10-9 after extra time, it was a mere 8-8 after 90 minutes. The quality wasn’t great but the drama as the game ebbed and flowed would be the stuff of TV executive wet dreams. An hour later I was back in Glasgow watching a fairly tame 2-0 win for Queen’s Park against Morton. You are probably more likely to get the odd 15 goal procession as the standard varies greatly from top to bottom but even those sometimes provide their own strange little spectacle.

Quality of play aside, what else do you need to know? Well, it’s a bit of a bargain with even the top sides rarely charging more than £5 although I would suggest that you have low expectations around catering facilities. Scotland games aside I am yet to find a women’s game where a pie can be had although usually there’ll be a way to at least find a beverage. Also whilst modern football stadia confines you to just one seat, given the relative sparse nature of the crowds and the types of venues these games take place at, you will be free to roam the terraces looking for the perfect spot. You will also invariably end up in a conversation with someone who is usually a friend or relative of one of the players.

All that being said the experience you have will be very much dependent on your mindset going into it. If you go with expectations of seeing the female versions of Messi and Ronaldo duelling in front of a packed stadium then I suggest you have a re-think. If however, you turn up with an open mind then I suggest the experience you have will be considerably better than lying flat on your couch as Huddersfield and Southampton do battle in pursuit of 15th place in the Premier League.

In a country where the women’s national side is infinitely more successful than their male counterparts it seems strange to say that the domestic game hasn’t really progressed all that much. Whilst Hibernian have emerged as real challengers to Glasgow City’s monopoly on the SWPL title, a recent top of the table clash between the two had an attendance no more than a couple of hundred and was delayed due to a lower league game being played on the same pitch running late. Top Scottish players now in the main play abroad and I have no doubt that some of the challenges covered here will have played a part in that.

Taking all things into consideration though it is important that you don’t let the sparse attendances make you think that the SWPL doesn’t matter. That you don’t use the occasional sloppy pass as a trigger to question it’s quality. Don’t let a 12-0 win let you think it isn’t competitive and don’t let a lack of media presence let you think that it’s not worth talking about. So why not take a chance one Sunday afternoon, you just might like it.