scottish football

Pie 72: The Blantyre Victoria Pie

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Have you ever tried to eat a pie in 28 degree heat? Yeah me neither, until now that is.

For the unaware amongst you a heat wave hit the west coast of Scotland that left many reaching for the Factor 50 and as the Commonwealth Games rolled into town I had enough time to nip to Castle Park, home of Blantyre Victoria, for a pre-season friendly before getting home just in time to see a bunch of dancing teacakes look on in horror as SuBo fluffed her lines.

It could have been worse though, for all we know wee Susie could have looked out at the psychedelic nonsense going on before her and thought she had died and gone to Tunnock’s heaven, diving head first into an unsuspecting volunteer trying to first tear the wrapper off the marshmallowy behemoth before consuming it whole. This of course leads to the all important decision of whether or not to lay out the empty foil flat on the ground or to roll it up into a tiny ball before flicking it into the distance in no particular direction. The poor lassie.

Sorry, went off on a tangent there. The point I was aiming when I started out here was that a roasting hot day is not ideal pie eating conditions, but as always I found a way to bring a new pie review to you.

So after finding a shady spot to cool myself down, let’s rate some pie!

THE SURROUNDINGS

Where: Castle Park, Blantyre Victoria v Pollok, Pre-Season Friendly. Entry: £3. Programme: None.

Storming the Castle Park walls to get some pie!
Storming the Castle Park walls to get some pie!

Price: There was no menu adorning the pie stall window, and in haste to get out the sun I forgot to ask how much I had to part with for my pastry. However using some simple algebra deducting the price of multiple cans of fizzy pop from the pie purchases of those around me I can confirm this pie can be yours for a solitary British pound. Bargain!

Presentation: It was white. It was medium-sized. It was a napkin. And that’s all I have to say about that.

THE PIE

Stick a flake in it and call it Pi-ce Cream!
Stick a flake in it and call it Pi-ce Cream!

Meatiness: This pie was perfectly pleasant. Nothing outstanding but a tasty meaty treat nonetheless. The meat was relatively well packed although did fall apart a little the more I bit into it. It was moist without being greasy and although the peppery linger didn’t last long on the palate it was still present after I’d finished. It was the kind of pie that is hard to get really enthused about but at the same time leaves you with nothing bad to say either.

Brown Sauce: That’s right we have a new section folks. It’s something I have toyed with in the past but my early season experiences have shown that the sauce itself is a stand alone feature of any pie whether it be good or bad. So how was the brown sauce at Castle Park? In a word: tangy, adding a sparkle of flavour that this pie was maybe slightly lacking. However be careful as too much and you could end up looking like your sucking an invisible milkshake through an equally invisible straw. It provided some added lubrication with a distinct tart tang.

Pastry: The pastry was soft and crumbly, the edges weren’t particularly crisp so there was no brown sauce dunking on this pie but it did mean that if you were in a rush you could eat this pie in a flash. This pastry would be a favourite with the pie eating sprinters but may disappoint those who are in it for the long haul.

Overall: New section about Brown Sauce aside this was a pretty standard pie, but for a pound you can’t really grumble.

Gravy Factor: Bog Standard Bisto.

All things going well my next review will be from Beith, home of one of the best pies of last season the luxury Chicken and Haggis Pie and one of the worst the Scotch Pie. Hopefully the Steak Pie on offer is closer to the former as opposed to the latter. In other news I will be the Scottish correspondent for The Football Pink this season, a link to which can be found on the left hand side of the page, starting with an SPL review that I plan to get done this week. Give the site a visit and order a copy should you get the chance.

However until next time, go forth and eat pie!

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Pie 70: The Raith Rovers ‘Steak’ Pie

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Hello and here we are once again ready to delve headfirst into another meaty morsel. It’s the second of two reviews from Starks Park home of Raith Rovers and Meat Filled Pastries first step into the luxury market this season.

The consumption of multiple pies at one venue is something that will be far less common this season, with this ritual being reserved for places where I am really unlikely to be visiting again, not due to disdain for my visit but due to the distances involved. Being based in Glasgow means that there is a plethora of clubs within an hours drive of home and so restricting myself to one pie at these venues will not only help my waistline but also ensure I will never run out of pies to review. Well that’s the theory anyway.

However without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

THE SURROUNDINGS

Where: Starks Park, Raith Rovers v St Johnstone, Pre Season Friendly. Entry Fee £10. Programme £1.50.

A Good Old Fashioned Looking Main Stand
A Good Old Fashioned Looking Main Stand

Price: At £2 this was 20p more expensive than the scotch pie offering from Kirkcaldy but given some of the prices that were flung at me when down south over the summer for luxury pies this seemed a relative bargain. I think by season end this will turn out to be one of the cheaper luxury pies to pass my lips.

Presentation: Unlike most steak pies this did not come with an aluminium foil cae wrapped around it instead trusting the structural integrity of the pie itself to hold firm once the first bite was taken. As is the case in the majority of pies this was served with a medium-sized white napkin.

THE PIE

Luxury awaits...
Luxury awaits…

Meatiness: Before I get into the meat of this pie matter a wee reminder that a luxury pie should be untainted and such none of the acetic brown sauce that nearly obliterated my scotch pie at Starks Park will be present on this pastry. Luxury comes at a premium price and with that comes greater scrutiny, the pie alone should provide all the flavour you need. So how flavoursome was this pie? It was not bad, not bad at all. First of all as football pies goes it was a generous handful, the meat was in large chunks but had a good mouth feel, coming apart as you bit off the tender strands of steak. It was seasoned well enough to give a strong savoury flavour although it lacked a little depth. Part of this could have been caused by the pie being a touch on the cool side. I also noticed that although there wasn’t a great deal of gravy within I at no point felt that the pie was dry which is once again testament to the precisely measured time it would have spent in the oven. This was a solid effort, perhaps a few tweaks short of something special but not a pie-saster by any means.

Pastry: As previously mentioned there was no tinfoil case to support this pie and as such that burden fell on the pastry something that it coped with more than admirably. The sides were slightly thicker than you would usually have on a pie but this meant that you could take a good-sized bite without worrying that your pie filling well end up splattered on the terrace floor below your feet. It had a puff pastry top which flaked as it should and although not particularly buttery or flavoursome it provided a suitable accompaniment to the pies meaty interior.

Overall: A solid if unspectacular start to the 2014/15 luxury market, it was a large pie with large meaty chucks and a substantial pastry case. Won’t be the best of the season I’m sure but certainly won’t be the worst.

Gravy Factor: Sturdy Gravy.

So that’s two reviews down and I feel I’m getting back into the swing of things. Next stop, Wishaw, and a return to Meat Filled Pastries spiritual home, junior football. Planning to cover UEFA’s week of football concept at some point over the weekend but until next time…..Go Forth and Eat Pie!

Remember to follow Meat Filled Pastries on twitter @MFPTasty and for any enquiries or feedback, and a thank you to those who have already, you can email meatfilledpastries@hotmail.com.

Pie 64: The Hamilton Accies Pie

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A Pie for Scholars or Academics if you will
A Pie for Scholars or Academics if you will

 

For me there is nothing worse than the football season to still be running and then waking up in the morning with the realisation that your team is without a game. Sometimes you have some forethought and a Plan B is well and truly in place and other times it just creeps up on you. The other week it just crept up on me and I found myself at 12 o’clock on a Saturday scouring the fixture lists for something meaningful to attend. The hash tag #helicoptersaturday led me to New Douglas Park and to perhaps one of the most remarkable games I have ever seen. Needing an 8 goal swing and for Dundee to drop points I watched on with my jaw genuinely on the floor as goal after goal flowed in and the pipe dream became a distinct possibility. Alas it was not to be as at Dens Park Dundee claimed all 3 points but for me and the couple of thousand fans at Hamilton on that Saturday afternoon we all left with a story to tell. A story of Hamilton Academicals 10 (TEN) Greenock Morton 2.

My point? If you have a choice between a day in the pub watching Soccer Saturday or actually going to the game then the smell of the grass and the ringing of the tannoy should always win out because at the end of the day you could end up being there to witness a little piece of history.

Anyway, the other benefit of attending NDP on Saturday was a chance to consume yet another pie, or 2 as it happened and so, without much further ado, let’s rate some pie.

Where: New Douglas Park, Hamilton Accies v Morton, SPFL Championship

Price: Focusing more on my belly than this here blog my initial pie purchase was done without taking a single bit of notice about the number of gold nuggets that had left my hands to pay for this meaty morsel. Luckily a cursory glance at the price list on a second trip to the refreshment stand revealed this scotch pie was priced at £1.80, competitively so for an SPFL Championship level pie.

Presentation: As classical as the medium sized white napkin is at non league level in Scotland the addition of a tin foil tray for your pie to sit in is the classical interpretation of presentation often presented to fans in the upper echelons of the game. Nothing ground breaking here.

Meatiness: I’m not going to lie, I had almost totally forgot to make my tasting notes about this pie and initially I felt guilty that I had let my tasting standards slip but now as I write this latest review my feelings have changed. You see, the reason why I almost forgot that I had a review to do was that this pie was almost instantly forgettable. Not to say that it wasn’t a perfectly serviceable footballing snack. It had all the right components. The meat was seasoned reasonably with a hint of pepper and it was packed snugly into its pastry surround however I found it lacked the moisture and natural lubrication that a little fat brings to your pie, praise the lord for the return of the brown knight of the pie table Mr. Sauce. As such it lacked a meaty punch and after the final bite had passed my lips I was left with that hollow feeling that only a mass produced pie could leave. It was just a little bit boring.

Pastry: The pastry was also achingly dull and sadly it also seemed incapable of holding the meat inside. As can be seen as soon as I lifted the pie to take my one crucial bite expose it felt apart limply when not supported by its shiny tinfoil shield.

Overall: Ach, it was just a bit dull. I didn’t hate it but when you consume as many pies as I do and then burden yourself with the task of writing about them then you need to find something exciting to write about these pastry jewels. In this case I was thankful for the game going on around me.

Gravy Factor: Sorry folks but it’s a Bog Standard Bisto.

Well this didn’t really meet the heights of the game I had the pleasure to attend but hopefully the next review, Hamilton’s Steak Pie offering can save the day.

Until next time though, go forth and eat pie!

Pie 61: The Cumnock ‘Onion’ Pie

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'This pie represents a call to arms!'
‘This pie represents a call to arms!’

In 3 days time (Friday April 11th 2014) entry’s close for the 2014 British Pie Awards and I’m using this latest entry into the Meat Filled Hall of Fame to encourage all you pie fans to ensure that the tastiest football pastries are proudly presented at this annual extravaganza. If you read this then please let your club know, let your fellow fans know whether they be supporters of your club or another and let the friendly faces behind the pie stalls up and down the country know that this is the time for their pastries to shine.

More information can be found at this link, http://www.britishpieawards.co.uk so go and have a look but until then with much gust and little further ado, let’s rate some pie!

Where: Townhead Park, Cumnock v Pollok, West Superleague Premier Division

Price: Priced at £1.20, this is the same price as the standard scotch offering, re-opening the debate as to whether or not an onion pie should be bracketed as one that is luxury in nature.

Presentation: I touched on the lovely ladies behind the counter in my previous review (Pie 60: The Cumnock Pie) so we can return our focus onto the ever classical but oh so minimalistic production values of the medium-sized white napkin in which this pie was nestled. Standard.

Meatiness: This pie had that distinctive waft of onion that I have come to associate with pies of this nature although not as strong as other similar offerings. The meat inside was formed in a way similar to a scotch pie, a seasoned block of mutton that whilst lacking in that distinctive peppery kick was laden with chucks of near translucent white onion. There was enough fat within the pie to keep it moist, perhaps a little greasy for some but nothing that a couple of extra steps on a treadmill couldn’t take care of. I would add that in this instance a dot of brown sauce would have definitely enhanced the overall taste experience due to the fact it’s meaty content was that of a scotch pie but as I am treating this as a luxury option not a drop was to be had on this occasion.

Pastry: The main distinguishing feature of this pie was the two holes on top of the classic scotch pie casing, this I assume helps to easily distinguish between the normal scotch and onion options available whilst serving. Outside of this it was a normal hot water pastry surround and top. It was a little bit caught around one edge but nothing that was too detrimental to the overall flavour of the pie. A solid pastry casing for the meat inside that tore apart as your mouth would expect it to on each bite.

Overall: A sweet onion pie that whilst different was also very much the same as the scotch pie effort. The large chunks of onion added extra flavour but maybe could have been a little more cooked through before adding to the mince. It would have benefitted from a glistening blob of brown sauce and perhaps being a tad less greasy but this was still a tasty treat.

Gravy Factor: Chunky Onion Gravy.

After a whistle-stop tour of East Ayrshire we have reached pie number 61, the next offering is to come from a yet undetermined location and as soon as I know the Meat Filled Pastries twitter, which you can follow on the right side of this page, will be the first place to tell you but until then go forth and eat pie!

My latest non pie piece ‘Deliberate Deliberations’ is found not only on Leading The Line but also at www.footballbloggingawards.co.uk looking at what constitutes a deliberate handball in the modern game. An archive of all my non-pie pieces can be found on Leading the Line and on The FBA’s website.

Did you know you can Subscribe to Pie? Simply go to www.meatfilledpastries.com and hit the ‘Follow’ link on the right and you will get an email advising of the glorious news that a new pie blog is ready for your consumption and while you are at it why not have a look at ‘Leading The Line’ a blog not based solely on Pies, crazy I know! The link is on the left hand side, and remember to visit ‘MeatFilledMerch’ for all your pie fashion needs where any personal profit made will go to The Grambler: Kick Cancer’s Backside Fund’ a truly worthwhile cause.

Pie 57: The Rangers ‘Macaroni’ Pie

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Bursting with Meat......
A Macaroni Filled Pastry

Hello pie lovers and welcome back to Meat Filled Pastries and it’s continual quest to champion football’s only snack of choice the humble pie. Let’s address the elephant in the room straight away. I already know what you’re thinking, ‘How does he have the audacity to call this splendifirous journey of pie Meat Filled Pastries when it’s clear to see that this is a pasta packed pastry presented before me?’. Well firstly, I would ask you to take the bass out of your voice and secondly make you aware of the badgering I have been subject due to the fact I hadn’t reviewed a Macaroni Pie. So here it is, a macaroni pie, if you’re still a bit miffed I hope the small bit of upcoming pie-related word play in this further explanation will help ease your confusion.

‘Meat Filled Pastries’ is a celebration of pie, specifically pie at sporting venues across this fair land of ours. In the main these pies will be filled with meat in a variety of different concoctions that have been brought to the fore on these pages. Some of the most talked about reviews wherever I go are when pies wander from their conventional scotch format and start throwing such ingredients as steak, beans, haggis or potato at you. It’s these curveballs of content that nicely leads into the final point of this introduction. How can we, as connoisseurs of pie, really know which pie is right for us when we don’t give them all a bash; or to put it in pun form ‘Diversi-pie’. To ‘diversi-pie’ is to truly become one with the ethos of Meat Filled Pastries.

So without much further ado, and as requested by the proprietor of www.dedicaked.com your one stop shop for all things cake whether they be popped, cupped or celebratory, let’s rate some pie!

Where: Rangers v Albion Rovers, Scottish Cup Quarter Final

Price: £2.35. 15p cheaper than the previously reviewed steak offering but 15p more expensive than the also reviewed scotch effort from Ibrox. Already this pie is causing me problems on review. Is this a luxury pie? It’s price, greater than a scotch, would suggest yes but can we truly call a Macaroni Pie one of luxury on Meat Filled Pastries? At present I’m undecided so let’s move on.

Presentation: Medium sized white napkin with a snug fitting tin foil case surrounding the pastry. I actually successfully turned this pie upside down without anything falling out but more on that in a bit.

Meatiness: Erm, right…there was no meat in this pie. How am I meant to review it’s meatiness when there is no meat within? Time for some tenuous linkage. Now as we know meat in its purest form comes from animals, in the case of a scotch pie it will come from mutton. Mutton is a form of lamb. Lamb’s are most often located on farms, as are cows. Cows, another provider of delicious meaty sustenance, regularly need milked. Milk when separated is turned into two parts; curds and whey. Curds are acidified and drained resulting in the very beginnings of cheese. These are then pressed and matured to turn into the cheese that we recognise in shops, burgers and this macaroni pie that I am trying to review before you. Therefore as cheese is derived from milk which is taken from a cow which we butcher for meat then this is indeed a meat filled pastry, huzzah!

Anyway, onto the actual tasting and after a week that was very heavy on the pie consumption it was actually a nice change of pace to bite down on something that wasn’t bursting with gravy. It was very much how I had expected, a compression of macaroni in a pastry case. The pasta was cooked well and there was enough of a cheesy hit coming from it to add another layer of flavour. My only complaint was that after a couple of bites it felt rather dry and going against the usual rules I applied a splodge of tomato ketchup for moisture and as such helping the last few bites slide down easily. Was it better than a bona fide meat filled pastry? That really depends on the pie you’re comparing it against. Against a standout steak or scotch then not a chance but against a bog standard offering I would say at least this offers something different.

Pastry: The pastry was of a more complex structure than your average scotch or steak pie. Although the side and base casing weere still standard in nature there was no top. Instead a layer of cheese that had almost burnt created an extra punch of cheesy flavour which did wonders for the overall effect of the pie. On the down side though, due to the fat content within the cheese there was a little bit of tearing when taking the pie out of its tin foil case due to it melting through. However as a man who likes his cheese this was something I merrily picked away at after consumption.

Overall: It’s never going to replace a meat filled pastry but if you are ever wanting a change of taste with your Bovril then this is well worthy of your time and appreciation. It was a little dry inside but I loved the cheesy top and I could defiantly see potential in this to become something truly special with a little more of the cheesy gravy inside and the potential to add ingredients such as ham or chilli. All in all a bit of an eye opener really.

Gravy Factor: Not your usual meaty gravy here but its cheesy cousin Monsieur Béchamel. Worth a try and the type of gravy I am happy to bracket as luxury due to its unusual nature.

Well that was a bit different and it would be a fair assumption to make on your part that this won’t be the last Macaroni Pie you will see. That said the next two offering’s come from East Ayrshire and Auchinleck Talbot, will their pies be as good as their performances on the pitch? We’ll have to wait and see.

Until next time, go forth and eat pie!

My latest non pie piece ’Pretty in Pink’ is found not only on Leading The Line but also at www.footballbloggingawards.co.uk looking at some of the pinkest kits you’re eyes ever did see and the stories behind them. I also encourage you to look out for my piece ‘Defining World Class’ on the same site, you’ll have to scroll down a bit but it’s definitely worth a read. Something new will be coming soon.

Did you know you can Subscribe to Pie? Simply go to www.meatfilledpastries.com and hit the ‘Follow’ link on the right and you will get an email advising of the glorious news that a new pie blog is ready for your consumption and while you are at it why not have a look at ‘Leading The Line’ a blog not based solely on Pies, crazy I know! The link is on the left hand side, and remember to visit ‘MeatFilledMerch’ for all your pie fashion needs where any personal profit made will go to The Grambler: Kick Cancer’s Backside Fund’ a truly worthwhile cause.

Pie 56: The Rangers ‘Steak’ Pie

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Steak pie Muthafudgers!
Steak pie Muthafudgers!

It’s pie time. Luxury pie time. Another hulking brute of pastry, steak and gravy. I’ve done a lot of pie reviews recently and as such I have very little new nonsense to spew forth in your direction as a pre-amble to the main event and therefore without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

Where: Ibrox Stadium, Rangers v Albion Rovers, Scottish Cup Quarter Final

Price: A rather hefty £2.50, a cash equivalent of 2 Junior level scotch pies and a full 50p more than another luxury option, the recently reviewed, Ayr United Steak & Ale Pie (Pie 54). A price symptomatic of the ludicrous idea that if you are a bigger club you are obliged to charge a bigger price when in fact all that you are increasing (apart from my waistband) is the profit you make. Seriously let’s think about this for a minute. How many pies do you think are consumed at Ibrox, Celtic Park or Hampden? A conservative estimate of 5000-7000 let’s say. Now how many are consumed at Cliftonhill, Newlandsfield or Ochilview? A couple of hundred. Now using a fairly basic knowledge of how business works and economies of scale, the larger the bulk amount initially purchased from the supplier is the cheaper the P.P.P (Price Per Pie) becomes. Basically what I am saying is I’m willing to wager a considerable sum that the P.P.P before selling onto the fans is far less at bigger stadia than at smaller grounds. Is that saving passed on? Erm, no. But at least the pie is of far superior quality? Well let’s move on form this digression and see before this rant takes on a life of its own and I end up with another website dedicated solely to the price of pies!

Presentation: Your standard steak pie presentation here. A medium-sized white napkin wrapped around a silver tinfoil case, although the case seemed a little battered and bruised and as a result was nowhere near as snug fitting as it would usually be as a pie with a hint of luxury in its make up. Not necessarily a bad thing, as in fact I think it will have prevented the all to familiar scald to the palm often associated with a hot pie and tin foil case.

Meatiness: Look here’s the thing it was a nice pie. The first bite produced a more mince based texture meaning a splurge of gravy landing on my lips and as I bit further in bigger chunks of shredded steak were there for my teeth to bite done on and chew. It was seasoned well a wee bit peppery with more salty than some of the other pies I’ve had on this journey but seasoned well nonetheless. The thing is I want my pie, not to be happy with being like all the others, but to stand out from the crowd and have an identity that can only be found at that one footballing location, this pie sadly did not meet that brief. Nice but a little bit soulless.

Pastry: The pastry was a mere receptacle for the meat inside. A well fired crust with a base that was soft without leaking into the tin foil case below. The looseness of the tin foil case no doubt helping to prevent the pastry sticking to the bottom of the case, a common problem often found when consuming a luxury pie. Once again it wasn’t offensive, in fact it was nice but was it going to live long in the memory? I don’t think so.

Overall: I think the thing that irks me most about paying a premium price for luxury pies in large stadia anywhere is that the addition of the word steak automatically justifies a hike in the price. If I was hungry and I wanted something to eat before or during the game it would do and I would be satisfied but unfortunately I cannot place more praise on it than that.

Gravy Factor: Bog Standard Bisto from Waitrose when really a trip to Tesco would be just as good.

Sorry that was rather uninspiring, the unplanned rant on pricing aside of course, but as you will already know from this journey I am seeking more than just taste in my pies. Hopefully the next effort from Ibrox later this week will have more to offer, I can guarantee you it’s certainly going to be different.

Until next time, go forth and eat pie!

My latest non pie piece ’Pretty in Pink’ is found not only on Leading The Line but also at www.footballbloggingawards.co.uk looking at some of the pinkest kits you’re eyes ever did see and the stories behind them. I also encourage you to look out for my piece ‘Defining World Class’ on the same site, you’ll have to scroll down a bit but it’s definitely worth a read.

Did you know you can Subscribe to Pie? Simply go to www.meatfilledpastries.com and hit the ‘Follow’ link on the right and you will get an email advising of the glorious news that a new pie blog is ready for your consumption and while you are at it why not have a look at ‘Leading The Line’ a blog not based solely on Pies, crazy I know! The link is on the left hand side, and remember to visit ‘MeatFilledMerch’ for all your pie fashion needs where any personal profit made will go to The Grambler: Kick Cancer’s Backside Fund’ a truly worthwhile cause.

Pie 55: The Queen of the South Pie

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A pie with no hands
A pie with no hands.

 

It’s the last day of British Pie Week so obviously the best thing to do would be to squeeze in one more review before the midnight hour strikes. The original plan was to give you a review from Arthurlie from the junior ranks but as anticipated weather put paid to that and as such I bring you my latest review from Dumfries in the form of Pie 55: The Queen of the South Pie. As I have mentioned before by eating a lot of pie, I see a lot of football and as such I thought it beneficial to have some kind of secondary purpose in this never ending journey of pie. That purpose is to visit every senior ground in Scottish football and was part of the reason as to why I found myself in Dumfries and not far closer to home. It is a goal that I am very close to completing and with the help of this site those long journeys that I used to shy away from are now far more palatable. That said this will never turn into a blow-by-blow account of my travels but I will be sure to let you know when my journey is complete.

For now let’s get the focus back on the meat filled wonders that have brought you here and without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

Where: Palmerston Park, Queen of the South v Hamilton Academical, SPFL Championship

Price: £1.50, once again priced at an equal level to those other scotch pies found at SPFL clubs out with the Premieriship. In my eyes this standardisation of price means that it is even more important for each club to find a pie that stands out from the rest of the crowd. Will this one manage to do so?

Presentation: A picnic blanket sized white napkin, almost too large as ridiculous as that sounds. On a windy day  I often found it wrapped around my pie and smothering brown sauce all over my hands at a time which wasn’t the most convenient for me. That said, thanks to its size, there was still ample tissue to dab my mouth corners with after consumption.

Meatiness: This was a nice pie, nicely textured meat, nicely flavoured with a hint of a pepper that did linger a little after the final bite was taken but that was about it. It was just kind of there, a perfectly acceptable meaty morsel that filled the breakfast shaped hole within but once again that was about it. If truth be told it was actually a little cold with the kind of temperature that would have wee Betty behind the counter in Greggs dubbing it as having a little heat in it and then following up with the question. ‘Are you sure you don’t want to wait five minutes for a warmer one?’ It was nice but a little bland and I would be doing an injustice to some of the other pastries on this journey if I was to smother it with praise.

Pastry: The pastry had a little bit more to it. It was lovely and crisp around the top edges and soft underneath although the top could have been fired for an extra couple of minutes for my taste as it looked a little anaemic. This combination of textures however meant that each bite was easy on the mouth with no risk of catching a jagged edge. There was a hint of butter in the pastry which is something often lost in the humble casing and as such boosted the overall flavour of the pie with a touch of added richness. The pastry certainly helped enhance the meat inside.

Overall: This pie was nice but not particularly memorable and also a little cold. A healthy squirt of some super tangy brown sauce was needed to really get a zing of flavour in the mouth. It did the job but you won’t find me beating a path down to Palmerston for yet another helping.

Gravy Factor: Bog Standard Bisto.

After the highs of Ayr United it was a bit of bump back to earth with this offering. With all the ‘wild’ cattle signs I passed on the roads down I maybe should have expected that my pie life would have been better if there was a steak offering but alas none were on show. This however does not stop my thirst for pie and a new review of the luxury variety will be on its way to you from Ibrox Stadium, home of Rangers, at the start of next week, most likely Tuesday.

Until next time, go forth and eat pie!

My latest non pie piece ’Pretty in Pink’ is found not only on Leading The Line but also at www.footballbloggingawards.co.uk looking at some of the pinkest kits you’re eyes ever did see and the stories behind them. I also encourage you to look out for my piece ‘Defining World Class’ on the same site, you’ll have to scroll down a bit but it’s definitely worth a read.

Did you know you can Subscribe to Pie? Simply go to www.meatfilledpastries.com and hit the ‘Follow’ link on the right and you will get an email advising of the glorious news that a new pie blog is ready for your consumption and while you are at it why not have a look at ‘Leading The Line’ a blog not based solely on Pies, crazy I know! The link is on the left hand side, and remember to visit ‘MeatFilledMerch’ for all your pie fashion needs where any personal profit made will go to The Grambler: Kick Cancer’s Backside Fund’ a truly worthwhile cause.