piehopper

Pie 191: The BSC Glasgow Steak Pie

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Hello and welcome to the latest review from Meat Filled Pastries, I hope this finds you well and that your start to the new year has been everything that you’ve wanted it to be and that your first game of the 202 has been an absolute rip-snorter.

After an hour or so at the artitist-formerly-known-as Recreation Park my first foot adventure to Clackmannanshire was looking like being anything but as BSC Glasgow and Bonnyrigg Rose cancelled each other out in this crucial Lowland League title clash. By the time the full time whistle had rung though my appetite for entertaining football had been suitable sated as the visitors from Midlothian let slip a two goal lead before snatching victory at the death, sparking wild scenes from a healthy travelling support and on the touchline, where the exuberance from Rose boss Robbie Horn and his staff saw the manager shown a second yellow card.

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Piehopping, or ground hopping if you don’t like pies (you maniac!), where you have no team to call your own can be a bit of a lottery in the entertainment stakes so to have a Friday night like this one in Alloa was a wonderful little treat.

But was the steak pie on offer a wonderful little treat too? There’s only one way to find out and so without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

Where: Indodrill Stadium, BSC Glasgow 2-3 Bonnyrigg Rose Athletic, Lowland League

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Price: £2.50. Quite expensive for a non-league pastry but just about within range for a luxury pastry in what are currently Scottish Championship surroundings.

Presentation: Laid upon a large white napkin and uncased, a rare occurrence for a steak pie. Plenty of space to manoeuvre it on as you ate.

Meatiness: This was a well-filled pastry packed with lots of bite-sized pieces of steak, some requiring a little bit of a chew but in the main nice and tender. The gravy had the viscosity required to coat the meat, a good thing, without spilling from the shell unwillingly, also a good thing, and had the balance of salt and savoury just about right.

Pastry: The top was a little squashed at the sides meaning it didn’t look quite as neat as you would want by the puff pastry lid was well baked, golden and added that crunch on top along with a meld of sauce and soft pastry on the under layers. The botton half of the pastry was a little soft that meant a little juggling was required to ensure no mass meat departures to the ground below but all in all a pretty solid housing of pie here.

Brown Sauce: Luxury, there is none, and I think going forward I’ll just skip this section for luxury pies going forward.

Overall: Very tasty steak and gravy with pastry that was perhaps a little soft underneath but still sturdy enough nonetheless.

Gravy Factor: A steak pie worthy of a football first footing.

It would be remiss of me not to mention the second of my match day meals in Alloa here in the shape of a cup of piping hot homemade stovies. Slices of potato and onion in a gravy populated with chunks of mystery meat, a Scottish classic. Add in a blob of brown sauce and at £1.50 it was the perfect way to warm you on the terraces.

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Unfortunately Meat Filled Pastries sponsored player for the season, Ross Smith, was out injured but I did get a chance to speak to a couple of behind the scenes faces at half time. For some it’s easy to be dismissive of clubs such as BSC Glasgow and Caledonian Braves but for their supporters and those that devote a significant amount of their free time on keeping them going you can only hope for success and a sustainable future. Both of the sides mentioned above are amongst the most innovative at the level when it comes to fan engagement and content creation and they bring yet another dynamic to the Scottish game.

Next time out we will be back in Glasgow as Benburb take on Pollok in the West Region Premiership, however until next time, go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. Editor of Leading the Line, A Scottish Women’s Football writer and a contributor to various football websites, podcasts and publications. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ and part-time Madrileno with a passion for food and football that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

Pie 190: The Whitletts Victoria Onion Pie

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Welcome to the first new pie review of the roaring twenties, the roaring of course coming from the well stoked fires of pie hut ovens across the land as we continue on our quest for Pie 200. We’re back at Dam Park for a second review from the home of Whitletts Victoria where, on this afternoon, the home side who usually play in red and black played in blue and the away side, Darvel, who usually play in blue, played in red as the eccentricities of modern football showed no discrimination irrespective of the grade.

The first review from the Vics earned an honourable mention in The 2019 Meaties published on New Year’s Day where, as well as crowning Meat Filled Pastries best Non-Pie Pastry, Meatfree Pastry, Luxury Pie and Scotch Pie of 2019, the first ever Outstanding Achievement Award was issued so why not go take a look.

For now though let’s head back to the windswept terraces of South Ayrshire, and without much further ado, rate some pie!

Where: Dam Park, Whitletts Victoria 1-4 Darvel, West Region Championship

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Price: Exactly the same as the Whitletts Victoria Scotch Pie coming in at a wholly reasonable £1.50.

Presentation: A rinse and repeat when compared with it’s scotch sibling, in fact, let’s just copy that same text “Presented on a large white napkin, ample for the pasty provided and for dabbing the lips.”

Meatiness: Much like the scotch offering this was a well filled pastry with a texture that was easy on the bite. There was a little peppery kick but to be honest if I hadn’t been called an onion pie by name I might not have known it at all. There was a couple of little slivers on inspection within but the sweetness that the onion usually brings to pastries of this nature wasn’t really there. It was tasty, just not quite what I was expecting.

Pastry: This pastry was well baked with a golden edge on the crust, the two steam holes that were the present the identifier that this should be an onion laced pastry. The bottom was sturdy and held the filling whilst the top was well sealed although not quite perfect in its presentation.

Brown Sauce: In a break from tradition when it comes to an onion pie I devoured this offering without going condimental. I reckon wee a blob or two of brown sauce wouldn’t have gone a miss though in retrospect.

Overall: Tasty enough but not very oniony.

Gravy Factor: A decent ladle full perhaps just missing that extra dimension.

It was a pretty decent double header from The Dam and I have high hopes that the 200 marker will come round in the not too distant future. What happens from there? Well we’ll have to wait and see as I have a couple of big changes coming up in my life soon that I suspect are going to take up quite a bit of my free time.

However until next time, and there’ll always be a next time, go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. Editor of Leading the Line, A Scottish Women’s Football writer and a contributor to various football websites, podcasts and publications. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ and part-time Madrileno with a passion for food and football that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

Pie 171: The Kello Rovers Pie

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Hello and welcome to the first of a trio of slightly delayed reviews as I round out my 2018/19 season in pie. This time around I head to one of junior football’s most southerly outposts, Kirkconnel, where Kello Rovers hosted Rossvale in the West Region Championship with a victory for the visitors guaranteeing them promotion to the top tier of the West Region pyramid for the first time in their relatively short history.

The home side had already been condemned to relegation a number of weeks previous but they put up a more than adequate showing in a surprisingly feisty end of season encounter. In fact on more than one occasion I had to recoil such was the ferocity of some of the tackles flying in from the home side.

Nithside Park, for reasons I can’t fully articulate or understand has long been on my wish list to visit. The only conclusions I could come to as we rattled through the countryside was that 1. it’s a bit far away (in a wet region junior football context at least) and 2. I’d never been. Having never been it also meant that I had probably, sub-consciously at least, unlocked reason three I had never sampled their meat filled goods and so it was with some relief to find that on arrival the pie stall was fully stocked which is a scenario that is not always guaranteed come season end. With sides balancing the demands of those on the terraces with the reality of having a whole load of perishables and nobody to punt them to for the next month or so I have on occasion been left disappointed on my pastry quests. Anyway, Kello Rovers did have the pies on, so without much further ado, let’s rate some pies!

Where: Kello Rovers 0-3 Rossvale, Nithside Park, West Region Championship

Price: At £1.20 this was bang in line with the standard price point for a junior scotch pie.

Presentation: Classically presented on a single white medium sized napkin.

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Meatiness: This was a very tasty squat little pie. The filling had a moreish savoury flavour profile, not so strong on the pepper but well seasoned, with a slight leaning towards the salty for some but bang on for my palate. The texture made the four or five bites in which it took me to demolish this pie some of the best bites that I’ve taken this season. An unexpected delight.

Pastry: This pastry glistened amongst the late spring showers at Nithside Park. The top edge was crisp and golden. It did look a little rough around the edges and was certainly a tad fragile to handle (especially when you had two in your hands!) but it held together just enough to ensure a safe consumption could be completed.

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Brown Sauce: A giant bottle of brown sauce was available to ensure that despite it being the last fixture of the season for the home side there would be no shortages in the condiment department.

Overall: Tasty savoury filling with good texture that very much makes this the little pie that could…satisfy my early afternoon hunger.

Gravy Factor: A little flavour bomb.

As I said at the start this late burst of reviews from the back end of the 2018/19 season are going out a little later than planned as a result of a couple of things which I’ll share in the upcoming reviews. My season in pie will round out with a double feature from Prestonfield as the home of Linlithgow Rose played host to the King’s Cup Final between Bonnyrigg Rose Athletic and Tranent Juniors. A cracker of a game on a sunny Lothian day.

So until, next time, go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. Editor of Leading the Line, A member of the SWPL Media Team and a contributor to various football websites and publications he also currently acts as Heart & Hand Podcast’s resident Iberian football expert, hosting “The Isco Inferno” a weekly take on all things Spanish football. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ and part-time Madrileno with a passion for food and football that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

 

 

Pie 166: The Bohemians Chilli Beef & Chorizo Pie

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Hello pie fans, and that’s right I’ve been on my football travels again crossing over the Irish Sea to take in Bohemians v Waterford in what the League of Ireland marketeers will have you believe is #TheGreatestLeagueInTheWorld as I made a whistle stop visit to the Irish capital, Dublin. My path here came via listening to an Outside Write podcast and a couple of follow up conversations with Gerry who runs the A Bohemian Sporting Life website all about the north side club. Not only did Gerry keep me abreast of ticket availability, he also let me have a look around The Bohs home Dalymount Park as well as joining me in what turned out to be many, pre and post match beverages with his buddy Brendan.

This isn’t the first time where my widening football connections has lead to a solo travel experience turning into an even better one with new friends as in March, when I headed to the Basque Country, Dan who runs The Linesman helped to fully indoctrinate me into the Athletic Club pre and post-match atmosphere. Something that I would have done on my own but was made infinitely better with some local knowledge. These acts of kindness are ones I’d be more than willing to replicate in my fair city and if anyone ever does find themselves wanting to know a bit more about football in Glasgow’s Southside I’ll always be happy to show the way.

One of the nuggets of information that Gerry was able to reveal to me before everything got a little hazy was that Bohemians were perhaps the only club in Ireland to have pies on their match day menu thanks to an arrangement with The Pieman Cafe located in the Temple Bar area of the city. This was obviously met with much delight on my part, and so at half time after collecting my customary pin badge I made my way to the queue to experience my first Irish pie eating experience.

So without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

Where: Bohemians 0-0 Waterford, Dalymount Park, League of Ireland

Price: €10. Yes, on first glance this is a whooping price for a pastry when you consider the site average up until this point floats around the £1.70 mark but this was not just pie alone and while that was an option, the temptation of having my pie with mashed potatoes, mushy peas and gravy truly was a temptation that my slightly tipsy and pretty hungry body could not resist. With a bottle of water thrown in too the €10 price tag seemed pretty good value in a city that has, what I think, a somewhat unfair reputation of being a bit pricey. Also, it was huge!

Presentation: Now given the component parts of pie, mashed potatoes, mushy peas and gravy it would have been lunacy to present this on the Meat Filled Pastries classic of a medium sized white napkin and so the brown box and fork combination were perfectly fitting in this scenario.

Meatiness: Chilli Beef and Chorizo is a new flavour sensation for the site and it is one that I think The Bohs, and of course The Pieman Cafe, executed admirably. The filling was exactly as a good chilli beef should be, there was a nice spice to the pie with beef and tomato undertones. There were kidney beans and onion present too and the texture was rich but smooth. If there was one small criticism then it would be that the promise of chorizo felt a little unfulfilled but it was still a super tasty filling nevertheless.

Pastry: Shortcrust pastry that seemed entirely in tact from what I could see. It’s sturdiness meant that it held up well to the many wet components around about it and as pastry goes it actually tasted pretty good on it’s own too. If you’re going to serve a pie this size with this assortment of sides a robust pastry shell is definitely the way to go.

Brown Sauce: There was no brown sauce but a couple of ladles of The Pieman’s homemade gravy which was just the ticket. I wouldn’t have added brown sauce as it would’ve been nothing but superfluous.

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Overall: Good filling in a massive pastry pie, really tasty beef chilli and gravy with just that little extra chorizo layer missing from it really delivering in every way. I would definitely have another one though.

Gravy Factor: There’s yer dinner!

Do Scottish football clubs limit themselves too much by just serving a single pie on a napkin? You know what, maybe. May be there are some out there but if the option to have a full pie dinner like this was on offer at our football grounds I would almost certainly be all in every time, especially after a few beers.

Next up is a review back in the Scottish Juniors as I visit Newmains United, a club who in recent seasons have shown they are not afraid to think outside the box when promoting their clubs name.

However until next time, go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. Editor of Leading the Line, A member of the SWPL Media Team and a contributor to various football websites and publications he also currently acts as Heart & Hand Podcast’s resident Iberian football expert, hosting “The Isco Inferno” a weekly take on all things Spanish football. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ and part-time Madrileno with a passion for food and football that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

For further queries or requests you contact Chris via email at chris_mersh@hotmail.com.

Pie 165: The Clydebank (c/o Maryhill FC) Breakfast Pie

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Hello pie fans I hope you enjoyed my saunter south of the border last time out as I took in the bright lights of Carlisle as the League Two promotion race in England heads towards it’s climax but it’s back to usual business this week with a return to the Scottish Juniors as Clydebank hosted Pollok at their temporary home of Lochburn Park in Maryhill.

One of the things that I have been focusing on since becoming more involved in women’s football is new and, let’s be honest, cost effective ways in which the game can be promoted. Lower leagues clubs across the country have to find ways to maximise their skills and resources in helping to attract new eyes to their club every day and so I thought I’d share just a few examples of that. St. Anthony’s, for example, have formed an alliance with clubs who have the initials S.A.F.C. in the make up of their name, this even involved their committee going down to the Stadium of Light after being welcomed down by Sunderland. Pollok are still (three years later) reaping the benefits of Tam Hanlon’s greatest hat trick ever scored which you can view here, a feat that garnered an appearance on Soccer AM and global attention. BSC Glasgow are one of a few clubs who now have an official eSports partner in the shape of @MozzaPlays who also went to the lengths of modding up the Lowland League for everyone’s favourite strategy game, Football Manager.

Clydebank themselves recently got in on the act with an excellently produced video celebrating Nicky Little becoming their club’s record goalscorer. Titled “Route 66” and shot exclusively on an iPhone it shows what can be done with a bit of time, care and willingness to learn. I encourage you to have a look at it here.

For my part, pies have become my default way to big up the beautiful game and over the next month or so I have some deadlines to meet to help share the story of pie even further. However for now, and without much further ado, let’s rate the first ever Breakfast Pie to enter the hallowed halls of Meat Filled Pastries!

Where: Clydebank 1-2 Pollok, Lochburn Park, West Region Premiership

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Price: I wasn’t expecting to have a new pie review to get my teeth into when I turned up at Lochburn Park however as the words, “What kind would you like?”, left the woman working the counter’s mouth an excited realisation spread across my face. Presented with the option of scotch, steak or breakfast there was really only going to be one winner and so I parted with £2, towards the top end of the non-league pie price scale, and went to find a spot in the shade so I could eat what was essentially my second breakfast of the day.

Presentation: This pie came wrapped in a double layer of large white napkins concealing the pastry at first sight, ample to help dab your mouth and lips as you made your way through what would turn out to be a pretty mammoth mouthful.

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Meatiness: The debate around what goes into a full breakfast – English, Scottish, Irish or otherwise – is a long and at times fairly tedious one. Some people froth at the concept of the inclusion of beans whilst to have a fry up without any bread and butter is seen as heresy by others. This pie though had enough of the commonly agreed upon component parts to keep everyone happy.

At the bottom there was a thick, maybe slightly too thick, slice of black pudding with that unmistakable texture and spicy kick. Above that was a layer of well textured and flavourful square sausage which of course had been made round to fit it inside the case. Above that again and to one side of the pastry was a slice of bacon as smoky and salty as bacon should be. Still going up you are then greeted by an egg, unfortunately no yolk porn here, as it would be near impossible to bake a pastry with an egg inside and keep the yolk runny before being topped with a few beans which had dried out a little in the oven but added that bean taste your mouth would recognise. Overall it made for a pretty tasty and exciting bite and if I could make any suggestions to improve the filling then I would pare back the black pudding a little and add a more generous spoonful of beans to add a little more moisture.

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Pastry: Let’s call it how it is, the pastry was a bit of a hot mess. I suspect partly driven by the desire to cram as many breakfast items as possible into its pastry walls and partly driven by some rough handling during transportation. Despite its ramshackle appearance it actually held surprisingly well adding the crispness required to help break up what was quite a rich filling.

Brown Sauce: It’s a luxury pie so there was no brown sauce added here but in retrospect I kind of wish I had given it a dollop, that spicy tang the sauce brings would have been a perfect partner for this pastry.

Overall: Generously filled with surprisingly sturdy construction despite appearances. I’d maybe alter the ratios of the filling slightly but as match day treats go I’m very much into it.

Gravy Factor: Gravy to get out of bed for.

A new pie style makes it’s way on to the pages of Meat Filled Pastries and there will be another new style next time out as I headed over the Irish Sea to see Bohemians take on Waterford in what the marketeers behind the League of Ireland are calling #TheGreatestLeagueInTheWorld. But does their Chilli Beef & Chorizo Pie really hit the mark, we’ll have to wait and see.

Until next time though, go forth and eat pie!

Glasgow Caledonian University. A member of the SWPL Media Team and a contributor to various football websites and publications he also currently acts as Heart & Hand Podcast’s resident Iberian football expert, hosting “The Isco Inferno” a weekly take on all things Spanish football. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ and part-time Madrileno with a passion for food and football that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pie 164: The Carlisle United Steak & Ale Pie

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I’ve gone rogue! That’s right I’ve infringed on rival turf and this last Good Friday I took a train down to Brunton Park to take in Carlisle United v Lincoln City in the race to escape League Two.

I have to say as footballing day trips from Glasgow go the hour long train ride from Glasgow Central to the populous heart of Cumbria is a pretty good one. The journey is relatively cheap, there are a good number of pubs in and around the city centre as well around the ground with Brunton Park itself a short twenty minute walk from the station. I’d recommend it and as I found on the train back to Glasgow later that evening I wasn’t the only visitor from north of the border to the Cumbrian’s that day.

The rugby club beside the stadium was busier than usual with over 2,000 Lincoln City fans in attendance hoping that The Imps would lift the title and so, after deciding to not wait in a massive queue for the second time, I headed into the stadium where I continued my supping as well as, of course, having a meat filled pastry.

So without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

Where: Brunton Park, Carlisle United 1-0 Lincoln City, English League Two

Price: There were two pricing options for this pastry. Option 1 was to buy the pie on it’s own for £2.80 or Option 2, to buy a pie and a pint (I’m not going to get deep into the booze at football debate here) for £6. Obviously I like the economics behind option number two and so promptly set myself up with a Steak & Ale Pie and a pint of Strongbow because it was sunny and sunny equals cider. The BBC Price of Football survey recently calls this out as one of the cheapest pies in the English Football League which, considering this game was in the bottom tier of this set up, is quite frightening.

Presentation: This was weird as after putting away my change I was presented with one of those white silver lined heat retaining bags which I was assured had my pie within. After finding a spot to watch the end of the Sheffield United v Nottingham Forest game, I opened the bag to then find my pie wrapped in plastic. I remove the plastic to finally have in my hand a fairly large pie housed with a silver tin foil case. So odd.

Meatiness: Well once I got to a bite with some filling in, my first couple of bites heartbreakingly shy of both meat and/or gravy, this was a fairly tasty mouthful. The gravy was viscous and plentiful enough with the right hint of ale to the overall taste but for me the steak was a little sparse and the chunks a little small which meant they didn’t add that meaty tooth feel that really pushes a pie onto greatness.

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Pastry: It and nice golden tinge to it but it was too soft. Soft, almost spongy, on the bottom and soft on the top with the flakes of pastry a little soggy. As soon as you got through your initial bite every one that followed there after resulted in the gravy squirting out all over the shop. Pastry on a pie, on the top at the very least, should be crispy. With it being hosted in this multitude of bags the pie had clearly steamed under the heat lamps and so the pastry for me was all wrong.

Brown Sauce: None for a luxury pie. Them be the rules.

Overall: The filling tasted pretty good but the wasteful nature of the packaging and the softness of the pastry really holds this pie back. I was surprised to learn as I entered the Pioneer Stand that this was an “Award Winning” pie and my concern is that once again a pie that wins prizes on the shelf of a butcher’s or baker’s shop had been compromised in the face of mass catering.

Gravy Factor: Spongy Gravy.

Would love to have this pie without the heat bags and plastics but this site designated to the best pies you can have at the ground and as long as the pie continues to be presented in this way it will remain a fairly tasty but slightly wrong take on the wonder that is a meat filled pastry.

Next up, I have a first for the site as I get elbow deep into a Breakfast Pie from Scottish Junior side Clydebank as they took on Pollok at their temporary home of Lochburn Park in Glasgow’s West End.

However until then, go forth, and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. A member of the SWPL Media Team and a contributor to various football websites and publications he also currently acts as Heart & Hand Podcast’s resident Iberian football expert, hosting “The Isco Inferno” a weekly take on all things Spanish football. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ and part-time Madrileno with a passion for food and football that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

Pie 159: The Petershill “Steak Pie”

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Hello again pie fans and welcome to the latest pie review to beat the big freeze. This week I venture to Springburn in the north of Glasgow to take in one of only four junior games to beat the weather as Petershill took on junior football’s current standard bearer’s and Scottish Cup giant killers, Auchinleck Talbot.

I had actually turned up at Petershill Park not expecting to have a new pie to review. I had been up to see the Peasy, Rossvale and various women’s teams over the last few seasons and only ever been furnished with a standard scotch pie or, as was the case on one occasion, a bridie. However as I stood in the queue the murmers were that a steak pie could be in the offing. As I approached the counter my curiosity heightened and with no menu in sight, I asked, “Can I get a steak pie please, pal?”…

“Aye love, anything else?”. Yes, success! I had a new pie. A pie I wasn’t expecting to taste and savour but there in lies the key question, was it indeed, a pie I was looking to savour?

Well there’s only one way that we’re going to find out, so without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

Where: Petershill Park, Petershill 0-7 Auchinleck Talbot

Price: I’ve totally dropped the ball here. I couldn’t see a price list and I had eaten yet that day so had bought some other things (a can of Diet Bru and a bag of cheese & onion in case you were wondering). I know that my final bill was £3.40 so the price of this pie is £3.40 minus the cost of a can of Diet Irn Bru minus the cost of a bag of Cheese & Onion crisps. One for all you algebra fans out there, if you know the cost of a can of Irn Bru and a bag of crisps at Petershill Park.

Presentation: Unusual in junior pie circles this steak offering was presented in a silver tin foil case and on top of a large white napkin although given the temperatures on the day I would have quite happily let the pie warm my hands and cool down naturally before I tucked in.

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Meatiness: This pie filling was pretty decent. There was a suitably fluid meat flavoured gravy wrapped around some various sized chunks of meat, from the size of dice to almost mince like in texture. The first bite revealed a little bit of a gap as can be seen in the accompanying picture but no bite was bare of meat and in a match day pastry that is something to be commended.

Pastry: A pie of two halves here. The top was well coloured with a little steam hole present to let out the heat. It slid out the pastry case with ease and without any sticky situations occurring. However the bottom was a little on the raw side meaning that it was a little bit claggy after a couple of bites. Luckily though the gravy and crispy side wall combination meant that it was still a perfectly serviceable mouthful.

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Brown Sauce: Luxury pies mean naked pies, however on surveying the kiosk area surroundings I couldn’t immediately spy anything to go condimental about if that was your desire.

Overall: Decent filling, decent gravy, decent pastry, even if it was a little under on the bottom. Yeah, decent.

Gravy Factor: Better than a KFC Gravy scented candle (and yes that is a thing!)

Bonus pie reviews are often the best pie reviews, especially at this time of year where fixtures can become a little scarce. I am potentially (Saturday night exploits dependent) going to make my way yo Tynecastle next weekend to see if The ‘Bot can repeat their exploits from the previous round whilst also gain some revenge for a 1-0 defeat to Hearts in the Scottish Cup seven years ago.

However until next time, go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. A contributor to various football websites and publications he also currently acts as Heart & Hand Podcast’s resident Iberian football expert and hosts “The Isco Inferno” a weekly take on all things Spanish football. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ and part-time Madrileno with a passion for food and football that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.