mince

Pie 95: The Yoker Athletic Pie

Posted on

Hello and we’re back to pies after my grand Canadian adventure before getting elbow deep in meat filled pastries I’d like to say a ‘Howdy!’ to my new Canadian followers, I hope you find my tales of pie just as entertaining as The VanCan ScranVan Diaries.

To say it was a joyous return to Scottish junior football would be a lie with the entertainment being provided by the never-ending stream of aircraft’s arriving into Glasgow as opposed to the game of ‘football’ going on in front of me. That being said I had just woken from a post-travel 15 hour slumber meaning that I was more than ready to devour a meat filled pastry or two.

It was good to see the SFA taking a sensible approach to Scottish Cup Final ticketing, they get slated a lot, and quite rightly so sometimes but when they do good it rarely gets acknowledged, if somebody wants to lend me a student card so I can get in for a fiver I’ll be even happier and maybe even your pal.

Anyway the end of the junior season means that a plethora of fixtures are coming hurtling towards me over the next couple of weeks and as such a plethora of pies, so let’s get back to it with this homecoming offering from Yoker Athletic.

So without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

THE SURROUNDINGS

Where: Holm Park, Yoker Athletic 1-1 Pollok, West Superleague First Division

Artistic Photography Fail
Artistic Photography Fail

Price: £1. A single golden nugget. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that.

Presentation: This pastry was presented to you on a small paper plate, an unusual, but not totally alien, presentational technique. The benefit of plating up your pie means that you can easily stack up multiple orders whilst also providing you with a substantial buffer to any potential overheating. There was also a pile of medium-sized white napkins for you to pick at freely for the all important post-consumption mouth wiping.

THE PIE

Princelike Plate Pie Presentation
Prince-like Plate Pie Presentation

Meatiness: This was a nice return to scotch pies for this lads palate. The pie was nicely filled, not bursting but substantial enough when looking at the all important meat to pastry ratios. It was firm, meaning that it ate well and didn’t fall apart and there was a lingering pepper kick, perhaps a tad weaker than I would prefer but still pleasant enough. It wasn’t ground-breaking but it certainly did the job.

Pastry: The pastry was well-baked. Crispy and golden on top. Soft but sturdy underneath. A perfectly acceptable receptacle for meat.

Brown Sauce: Despite supposed dwindling sales it was still HP that did the job.

Overall: A pleasant filling, well-baked pastry that stayed together well and a dollop of HP sauce readily available. There was not much to complain about but at the same time not much to get carried away with either.

Gravy Factor: Bog Standard Bisto. Well actually, it was slightly better than that but at present I’m not sure if a luxury Bisto brand exists? If it does I would rate it as that.

Another pie down. Looking ahead towards the end of the season (and barring a catastrophe on my part) we will hit 100 pies before the final goal goes in, and that even in my ludicrous world of pie is some achievement! Next up will be another junior review from Kilsyth Rangers.

However until next time, go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. He has contributed to prominent football sites including Pie & Bovril, The Terrace Podcast, The Football Pink and The FBA’s as well as featuring in The Scotsman, STV and a number of other media outlets. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ with a passion for food that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

 

Pie 91: The East Kilbride Thistle Pie

Posted on

Hello, apparently I’ve been away for too long and on reflection it has been nearly 3 weeks but I would like to take this opportunity to remind folk I don’t get paid for any of this and sadly the realities of a normal working life mean that occasionally I’m too scunnered to do anything other than come home and sit on my bahookie whilst dreaming about a life on the Spanish coast. Anyway, my apologies, I’m back for a two-week burst before I’m off on my travels to Vancouver . My hope is that either the Whitecaps and/or Canucks will be able to add to the rather small Passport Pies section of the site but failing that there could be a food inspired mini blog in the works whilst I’m away.

I ended up in East Kilbride on a bit of a whim, the Pollok game having been called off due to a waterlogged pitch in Hurlford despite not a drop of rain falling from the sky for two days previous and a desire to have some pints with my pals. Anyone who has an understanding of junior football grounds will tell you if a game is on at the notoriously flood friendly Showpark then the likelihood is games will be on everywhere else. It was all very strange.

Anyway it’s always interesting to go to a game a bit further down the leagues, if only to get a true understanding of what the level of play you normally watch is really at, it also meant there was new pie for me to review so without much further ado, let’s get to it, let’s rate some pie!

THE SURROUNDINGS

Where: The Showpark, East Kilbride Thistle 1-2 Johnstone Burgh, Central District Second Division

One of my finer pieces of photography. Although I can ensure you the crowd was bigger than the 4 individuals snapped here.
One of my finer pieces of photography. Although I can ensure you the crowd was bigger than the 4 individuals snapped here.

Price: A scotch pie at £1 is something that no fan, especially those of us who have experience of visiting much larger venues, should ever sniff at. Bargain.

Presentation: Sporting the classic medium-sized white napkin look that has become the most trustworthy of pie presentational techniques as this journey has unfolded. It’s not exciting but it does the job.

THE PIE

A Brown Sauce Test.
A Brown Sauce Test.

Meatiness: This was a funny little filling, it was well packed and had a softly spiced hit of flavour. There was no peppery kick as such but there was enough intricacy of flavour to keep the palate dancing. That said there was a couple of issues, the pie was incredibly moist, in fact to be honest probably too moist and an over elaborate hand gesture on my part led to a small trickle of grease rolling down my arm. Now as an experienced consumer of pies I know how to handle such scenarios, tilting the pie ever so slightly upwards as I continued but my friend, who had joined me just after kick off, was getting himself into an awful mess. Although greasy I actually think on this occasion it wasn’t too detrimental to the overall taste of this filling, it would have been nice though it if was dialled back just a little.

Pastry: The pastry was a funny little thing too, despite appearing quite anaemic in colour apart from a golden tinge around the top edges it was in fact very tasty as a singular entity perhaps boosted by some of the fats within absorbing into the pastry itself. It was perhaps a little soft but then it stayed together fairly well as I munched my way through, although once again my cohort had managed to take the whole top off in one bite and was continuing to get in a right old mess.

Brown Sauce: Not the sharp and spicy burn of an HP, this sauce had an almost BBQ flavour, matched with the sweet spiced filling it made for a quirky finish to each mouthful.

Overall: In theory this pie should have been a bit of a write off, it didn’t have my much-loved peppery kick and it was a tad greasy. The pastry was soft and the brown sauce wasn’t quite right but yet I find myself saying this was a fairly enjoyable effort.

Gravy Factor: Only for consumption by experienced pie handlers. More Krypton Factor than Gravy Factor for those uninitiated in the way of the pie.

Well that was a funny little thing, subsequent of a funny little day where I found myself thinking how, in a day of glorious sunshine (if not a bit chilly), did my original fixture not make it. Well that game did eventually make it on and that will be the focus of Meat Filled Pastries next review, The Hurlford United Pie.

But until, next time, go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. He has contributed to prominent football sites including Pie & Bovril, The Terrace Podcast, The Football Pink and The FBA’s as well as featuring in The Scotsman, STV and a number of other media outlets. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ with a passion for food that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

Pie 89: The Airdrieonians Pie

Posted on

Hello and welcome back to a more conventional offering from Meat Filled Pastries after the pastry deviation that occurred last time out. This week I was pointed to an article by The Guardian’s Daniel Taylor about Stan Collymore and his one man sectarianism crusade. It can be found at the following link:

http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2015/feb/21/debate-old-firm-rangers-celtic

Here were my instantaneous thoughts and I thought I’d share them, let me know if you disagree.

“This whole thing really gets on my wick because the entire debate is driven by ‘dunderheads’. Dunderheads sing the songs on both sides and then the same bloody Dunderheads bitch and moan about the nasty songs being sung at them because they are the antithesis of the archaic message they are happy to communicate.

Is Stan Collymore right to question why it still goes on? 100%.
I
s he right to focus his attention on Rangers and Rangers alone? Of course not.

And in this issue the problem lies, there has always been a ‘us and them approach’ to resolving sectarianism in Scotland and believe me it’s not just at Ibrox and Celtic Park these barbs are heard, I dot around a lot of grounds and the UVF and IRA are inexplicably championed here too.

If only there was a governing body with no premise of bias and the ability to impose real sanctions on those fans who continue to waive their right to not being dunderheads. Like some kind of Scottish Football Association type thing, surely they would have actually done something about it by now.

It is a problem that will never leave our terraces until somebody in a blazer grows some balls!


The sad fact is that if any politician was asked what needs done about the sectarian issue they’ll reel off a bunch of children focused campaigns. It’s not children that need educated on the rights and wrongs of living in a modern and cosmopolitan society, they understand it, it is how they have always been known to live there lives, it’s the adults, the people that are meant to be setting the examples, who are in desperate need of an education!


With all that being said Stan Collymore is still a Grade A wazzock!”

He is still a Grade A wazzock but he’s a wazzock with a point, an ill-structured and not very well thought out point but a point none the less. There is no sadder indictment of ‘Scotland’s Shame’ that the fact it takes somebody like Stan Collymore to point out that absolutely nothing effective is being done to stamp out sectarianism and once again bring this ugly debate to the fore.

Anyway, there’s my two cents, I’m not going to visit it again until somebody actually does something meaningful, so without further ado let’s rate some pie!

THE SURROUNDINGS

Where: The Excelsior Stadium, Airdrieonians 3-1 Forfar Athletic, Scottish League One

Pay What You Can Pie Days!
Pay What You Can Pie Days!

Price: At £1.70 this was a reasonably priced pastry treat from North Lanarkshire. Around average.

Presentation: Ensconced in a shiny silver foil container with a large white napkin that was plentiful in all its softness, something I was extremely greater for as the consumption process began.

THE PIE

Pay What You Can Pie Day

Meatiness: This was a really well-flavoured pie, it had a strong savoury streak however there was no peppery kick present. It was quite greasy as evidenced by the small shimmering pools that glistened on top of the pastry which meant that the mixture inside was very loose. In fact its looseness meant that there was a great deal of juggling required as I went through it meaning I was grateful for the heat retaining silver container below catching the dribs and drabs of meat as they fell. I was very near tempted to do the puddle test and tip the pie towards the ground but a group of young ruffians behind me had beaten me to the punch. Tasty but greasy.

Pastry: The pastry was a little anaemic in colour but that could be attributed to the grease on top and in actuality it held together well as I took bigger and bigger bites whilst the filling crumbled all around it. The base was slightly soft but nowhere near the soggy mess that sometimes hinders a foil wrapped pie.

Brown Sauce: A small sachet of Lichfields brown sauce, did the job but nothing fancy.

Overall: A tasty pie but a greasy pie. Not one that does many favours for your arteries.

Gravy Factor: Full Fat Gravy. Not one for the dieticians.

A decent effort from Airdrieonians in the pie stakes and an excellent effort in the fan stakes with their pay what you can offer for a Saturday evening kick off. Smart thinking like this should get the crowds in when maybe you don’t expect them. Next time out we’ll have a luxury offering from the home of golf St Andrews, but until then go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. He has contributed to prominent football sites including Pie & Bovril, The Terrace Podcast, The Football Pink and The FBA’s as well as featuring in The Scotsman, STV and a number of other media outlets. A perennial Scottish Sporting Optimist with a passion for food that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

Pie 87: The Rossvale Pie

Posted on

Is anyone else fed up with the weather playing absolute havoc with their Saturday fixture plans. I mean for a man who writes about football pies it’s been a minor inconvenience, if anything it has expanded my horizons as I go to games that would have been consigned to sporting history as I followed my team across the country. These ever burgeoning horizons I find myself heading towards resulted in my first pie related television appearance on The Riverside Show last week. It was a surreal, but thoroughly enjoyable, experience and one that perhaps reignited a fire that had been dampened somewhat as the grind of real life meanders oh so slowly by.

I don’t know if this means that I’ll be taking David Currie’s job on Sportscence any time soon but maybe, just maybe, I can find a way to get paid for all of this. I’ll never go begging and I’d like to think that the initiative (something that is forever championed as the best way to get your foot in the door) this project has shown will one day illuminate my path to, what some would call, legitimacy.

For now though I’m happy enough with the path that these pastries has led me on. Anyway we all know why we’re here, so without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

THE SURROUNDINGS

Petershill Park, Rossvale v Musselburgh Athletic, Scottish Junior Cup 4th Round

Looking at this you wouldn't think there was hardly a game on that day!
Looking at this you wouldn’t think there was hardly a game on that day!

Now before I get too deep into this, I went to this game knowing that I had previously had a pie from the very same venue, one of my earliest reviews, Pie 16: The Petershill Pie and to be honest it didn’t go very well. Now retrospect suggests that having a tequila based hangover may have had a slightly adverse effect on my review but I still know that some things were fundamentally wrong and I was curious to see if much had changed from my visit 16 months previously.

Price: At £1.50 it was the top end of the junior scotch pie price spectrum but still reasonably priced for a football based pastry snack.

Presentation: On my last visit I bemoaned the use of a plastic and paper bag to store the pie in and once again I was presented with a pie in such a reciprocal. However differing from previously this pie was also surrounded by a tin foil sheath. Not a big deal I hear you say, but this aluminium shield stopped the pie in its entirety steaming against the plastic. I don’t know if there is a reason for the bags at Petershill Park but people’s pie lives would be enhanced further if the bag was taken out of the equation. There were some small white napkins available of the self-service variety for mopping your mouth with.

THE PIE

Well fired!
Well fired!

Meatiness: This pie was a well-formed, safely seasoned scotch pie. The filling fell apart a little as I chewed my way through and I was pleased to feel a peppery linger on my palate that slowly built up as I neared final consumption. It wasn’t anything mind-blowing, it hit all the key points a decent pie should without moving on to the next level but it was definitely a marked improvement on the pie I had experienced the last time I visited the north of Glasgow.

Pastry: As can be seen the top edges were rather crispy. Well OK, they were burnt meaning that there was a slight bitter undertone to each bite. I’m sure if I visited another time this extreme crispiness would not have occurred. I previously mentioned how the tin foil case had helped reduce the moisture inside the bag however sadly there was still a slightly soggy bottom to this pie, however if you mixed it with the well fired top the texture was probably just right!

Brown Sauce: Wee sachets of mass-produced no-name sauce. Did the job.

Overall: A better effort from Petershill Park, and perhaps Rossvale deserve individual credit for providing their own pies. I’d love to know the right answer. That said it was a little burnt on top and a little soggy on the bottom but had an overall good pie flavour.

Gravy Factor: Bog Standard Bisto. Just take it out the oven a bit quicker next time.

I literally have no idea where my next review will emanate from. Last week I was so convinced that my scheduled game would be on I got so sozzled on the Friday night that come the news that it has indeed been called off I was in no real fit state to drive. What I can assure you of though it will most definitely be pie number 88.

However, until then go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. He has contributed to prominent football sites including Pie & Bovril, The Terrace Podcast, The Football Pink and The FBA’s as well as featuring in The Scotsman, STV and a number of other media outlets. A perennial Scottish Sporting Optimist with a passion for food that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

Pie 85: The East Kilbride FC Pie

Posted on Updated on

Needless to say if I want to get back to the 2016 World Scotch Pie Championships then I must plough forward on this journey and so without much further ado let’s rate some pie!

THE SURROUNDINGS

Where: K Park, East Kilbride FC v Preston Athletic, Scottish Lowland League

Game on, thanks to tractor power.
Game on, thanks to tractor power.

Price: Priced at £1.50 it was 50p cheaper than my only other Lowland League review to date from Stirling University but more expensive than a top end junior scotch pie. I find myself wondering if the increased cost of pie at these games is a consequence of SFA licensing costs as clubs strive to break into the closed shop that is the Scottish Professional Football League. Good luck to them all I say.

Presentation: Although East Kilbride FC are a club in its infancy it’s good to see that the ever classic medium-sized white napkin is king of the K Park terraces when it comes to presenting your pastry wares.

THE PIE

A Hot Pie on A Baltic Day
A Hot Pie on A Baltic Day

Meatiness: This pie had a contrasting, almost sweet, and savoury flavour. The filling was just about moist enough without being greasy but was also quite crumbly in texture meaning that a bit of jaw gyration was required to ensure that you didn’t lose any meaty morsels. As followers will know I like a peppery kick to my pie and although there was only a very faint linger of pepper heat in the background as a counter to the ever-increasing sweetness it didn’t mean that this pie wasn’t a tasty treat. A different kind of scotch pie.

Pastry: The pastry was soft, perhaps too soft as when lifting it from its paper napkin bedding it stuck a little leaving small blobs of pastry which then made it a bit difficult to use when it came to wiping your mouth on completing consumption. The pastry was however incredibly buttery, well from what I could tell anyway, and this added some extra moisture that perhaps the filling was lacking.

Brown Sauce: HP. From a bottle so cold that I’m surprised it didn’t come squirting out in little brown ice cubes it is still the king of pie condiments none the less. Maybe keep it inside the hut next time the snow’s falling.

Overall: An almost sweet pie with a buttery finish from the pastry, a welcoming hit of warmth on a bitterly cold day.

Gravy Factor: Bog Standard Bisto with a teaspoon of sugar.

15 away from a ton. A ton of pie, how’s that for a mental image. Next pie up will most likely be from a venue with a different shaped ball as Meat Filled Pastries heads to Scoutston to watch Glasgow v Montpellier in the European Rugby Cup.

However until then, go forth and eat pie!

Pie 84: The Ardrossan Winton Rovers Pie

Posted on Updated on

Hello and welcome to the last Meat Filled Pastries of 2014. What a year of pie it has been. I’ve managed to score a couple of freebies, spread my gospel of meat and pastry in a couple more match day programmes and, perhaps most significantly, got my taste buds around some of the best (and worst) football pies around at the 2015 World Scotch Pie Championships Judging Day.

This adventure just keeps rolling on and just when I think that the pastry laden path I meander along has made things as surreal as they could possibly be it has me hurtling down the rabbit hole like a pie starved Alice in a wonderland of mutton, mince, onion, pastry, steak and gravy. Thank you to those of you that have shared, printed, spoke about and, quite frankly, indulged me on this journey over the last 12 months. I hope you continue to do so in 2015.

Sentiments aside, the reason why you are all here is to once again dive head long into a wonderfully meaty treat. So without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

THE SURROUNDINGS

Where: Winton Park, Ardrossan Winton Rovers v Glenafton Athletic, West of Scotland Cup 2nd Round

Some Retro Signage
Some Retro Signage

Price: Priced at £1.20 this is perhaps a little more expensive than you would expect at an Ayrshire District League ground but the good folk at Ardrossan are packing a secret as the pie they stock is none other than the 2014 World Scotch Pie Championship Winner. Therefore making an apparently premium junior price seem like a bit of a bargain.

Here's the sign to prove it
Here’s the sign to prove it

Presentation: After a slightly strange array of offerings recently it is almost fitting that the last pie of the year should not only be a champion but also presented in the ever classical medium-sized white napkin leaving the pie neither over or under dressed. You know I’ve always wondered if Coco Chanel would approve of such paraphrasing when the subject matter it relates to is so big and meaty.

THE PIE

2014 World Scotch Pie Championship Winner
2014 World Scotch Pie Championship Winner

Meatiness: As I stared at the placard on the side of the pie stall that proclaimed the presence of a world champion pie my expectations were immediately raised. A reward for jumping in my car and seeing where the footballing gods wanted to guide me. It did not disappoint. The pie was moist but not greasy. There was a peppery hit that as opposed to being sharp and acrid was smooth and lingered long in the pallet. Once the pepper had dissipated you were left with a mutton finish that did indeed have you biting down for more. It was clear to me why this was considered a pie of the highest order.

Pastry: This is going to sound a bit odd but when reviewing my notes of this pie I’ve described the pastry as meaty. As I rack my brain trying to get my taste memories past Christmas Dinner I remember thinking that the pastry had managed to retain some of the juices from its meaty insides. It also had a light buttery finish with a nice crumble and sufficient enough to hold the filling as I munched my way through.

Brown Sauce: A sweet and tart offering from Spar presented in a squeezy bottle. If I’m being honest I felt the sauce, on this occasion, detracted from as opposed to enhancing the flavour of my pastry.

Overall: I would have like to have tasted this pie without knowing of its prestigious history just to see if it really was as good as it appears as I can’t help but feel a blind tasting would have brought a truer review unaffected by the fame of it all. That said there is no doubting that this was a belter of a pie.

Gravy Factor: King of Pies, for now. A contender for the 2015 crown we’ll have to wait and see but for now Michelin gravy.

Pie 84 is where this year’s tally will end, but there is no doubt in my mind Pie 100 will come to us all in 2015. I had planned an additional review from Ardeer Thistle however they had, rather upsettingly, ran out of pies when I finally reached the front of the queue 15 minutes after kick off. Whilst disappointed my sorrow was tempered when I was greeted with the same World Scotch Pie Championship Winner sign that had greeted me at Ardrossan just a couple of weeks earlier. I assumed they must be the same.

Anyway, here’s to 2015, go forth and eat pie!

Pie 83: The Thorniewood United Pie

Posted on Updated on

It’s Meat Filled Pastries Time! Let’s. Get. Meeeeatyyyy!

Hello, hope you’re well, I thought today I’d address just a couple of the most commonly asked questions I’ve received since starting my journey of pie. Just a couple though, I wouldn’t want to be struggling for words when it comes to writing my memoirs. I thought the best way to do this would be to answer the two questions that are asked by 90% of the people who hear my story, namely, “Who Does the Best Pies?” and “Don’t You Ever Get Sick of Pies?”. Consider it an end of year treat for you all.

Firstly let’s address the number one question I’m asked, “Who Does the Best Pies?”, but to be honest it’s far more complex than blurting out a name or venue. For starters there are lots of different types of pie available, some scotch, some steak and some completely different. To pick one, as a solo muncher of pies, when there is a multitude of parameters to consider would be reckless on my part. Secondly I like to think the best I’ve ever had is always the next one to pass by my lips, call it part of my relentless optimism to do with all things related to pie. That not a good enough answer? Sounding a little too measured and political? Well OK then, some standouts for me are ‘The Beith Chicken & Haggis Pie’ and one I haven’t ever reviewed on the pages of Meat Filled Pastries ‘The Burghead Thistle Mince Pie’. Two that still to this day linger long in the taste buds.

Secondly, ‘Do I Ever Get Sick of Pies?’ Course not silly, pies are awesome.

Seriously though, not really. Due to the volume I find myself consuming at football matches it’s not something I tend to have for my dinner or lunch. My favourite item from Greggs is a Roll and Chicken Bake and the amount of effort that goes into making a really good pie, pastry and all, means that they tend to get made as treat (usually for the amusement of others) as opposed to being a regular item on my homemade menu. I like pies but I love food and to limit myself to one item would be just too much to bear.

That said this one item has gave me a lot of stories and brought me a lot of fun, so without further ado let’s rate some pie!

THE SURROUNDINGS

Where: Robertson Park, Thorniewood United v Pollok, West of Scotland Super League First Division

Pretty sure I got trench foot...
Pretty sure I got trench foot…

Price: £1.20. Slap bang in the middle of the junior price range for a scotch pie. Can’t really have too many complaints with that.

Presentation: Aside from the ever classical medium-sized white napkin this scotch pie was presented in a tin foil case a somewhat unusual style for a scotch pie, even more unusual for a junior pie. Perhaps I have been doing this too long already but when I noticed its shiny silver surround a little part of me actually went, ‘oh, that’s new!’, and you know what, it was!

THE PIE

Oooooo silver, fancy!
Oooooo silver, fancy!

Meatiness: This pie was very moist but as I sit here typing this latest review I find it hard to remember anything standout about it, reviewing my short notes on the day moist is all I had written. Moist and pleasant (Mind out the gutter please folks). Something I will admit, and is apparent as I write this review, that if a pie filling is relatively tasty, has nice seasoning and doesn’t leave a waxy trail of grease glued to my arm then it’s fine by me. It just doesn’t give me a whole lot to write about. This pie is an example of that. Absolutely nothing wrong with it but not one to be stored in the vault.

Pastry: It had a nice crispy top with an even thickness of pastry all around. It was perhaps a little soft underneath. A consequence of the tin foil case it sat within but nothing went where it shouldn’t be as I ate. Did a job.

Brown Sauce: This brown sauce was a lot lighter in colour and was almost apple sweet, it had a gentle tang to it and was a nice complimentary flavour to the pastry and meat underneath.

Overall: Nice enough, but won’t live long in the memory.

Gravy Factor: Bog Standard Bisto.

A solid if unspectacular effort from Tannochside, the junior pie bandwagon rolls on with an offering from Ardrossan Winton Rovers and it’s something that is a little bit special.

However until then though, go forth and eat pie!