Month: April 2015

Pie 95: The Yoker Athletic Pie

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Hello and we’re back to pies after my grand Canadian adventure before getting elbow deep in meat filled pastries I’d like to say a ‘Howdy!’ to my new Canadian followers, I hope you find my tales of pie just as entertaining as The VanCan ScranVan Diaries.

To say it was a joyous return to Scottish junior football would be a lie with the entertainment being provided by the never-ending stream of aircraft’s arriving into Glasgow as opposed to the game of ‘football’ going on in front of me. That being said I had just woken from a post-travel 15 hour slumber meaning that I was more than ready to devour a meat filled pastry or two.

It was good to see the SFA taking a sensible approach to Scottish Cup Final ticketing, they get slated a lot, and quite rightly so sometimes but when they do good it rarely gets acknowledged, if somebody wants to lend me a student card so I can get in for a fiver I’ll be even happier and maybe even your pal.

Anyway the end of the junior season means that a plethora of fixtures are coming hurtling towards me over the next couple of weeks and as such a plethora of pies, so let’s get back to it with this homecoming offering from Yoker Athletic.

So without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

THE SURROUNDINGS

Where: Holm Park, Yoker Athletic 1-1 Pollok, West Superleague First Division

Artistic Photography Fail
Artistic Photography Fail

Price: £1. A single golden nugget. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that.

Presentation: This pastry was presented to you on a small paper plate, an unusual, but not totally alien, presentational technique. The benefit of plating up your pie means that you can easily stack up multiple orders whilst also providing you with a substantial buffer to any potential overheating. There was also a pile of medium-sized white napkins for you to pick at freely for the all important post-consumption mouth wiping.

THE PIE

Princelike Plate Pie Presentation
Prince-like Plate Pie Presentation

Meatiness: This was a nice return to scotch pies for this lads palate. The pie was nicely filled, not bursting but substantial enough when looking at the all important meat to pastry ratios. It was firm, meaning that it ate well and didn’t fall apart and there was a lingering pepper kick, perhaps a tad weaker than I would prefer but still pleasant enough. It wasn’t ground-breaking but it certainly did the job.

Pastry: The pastry was well-baked. Crispy and golden on top. Soft but sturdy underneath. A perfectly acceptable receptacle for meat.

Brown Sauce: Despite supposed dwindling sales it was still HP that did the job.

Overall: A pleasant filling, well-baked pastry that stayed together well and a dollop of HP sauce readily available. There was not much to complain about but at the same time not much to get carried away with either.

Gravy Factor: Bog Standard Bisto. Well actually, it was slightly better than that but at present I’m not sure if a luxury Bisto brand exists? If it does I would rate it as that.

Another pie down. Looking ahead towards the end of the season (and barring a catastrophe on my part) we will hit 100 pies before the final goal goes in, and that even in my ludicrous world of pie is some achievement! Next up will be another junior review from Kilsyth Rangers.

However until next time, go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. He has contributed to prominent football sites including Pie & Bovril, The Terrace Podcast, The Football Pink and The FBA’s as well as featuring in The Scotsman, STV and a number of other media outlets. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ with a passion for food that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

 

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The VanCan ScranVan Diaries: The Roaming Dragon

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Hello and welcome to the third, and final, instalment of the The VanCan ScranVan Diaries, a short experiment in food writing where the words meat, filled and pastries have been in short supply. I’m writing this final instalment in the bowels of the maze that is Heathrow Airport as I wait for my connecting flight home. If I hadn’t been on my holidays this could have turned into a far grander project but as it is it’s been nice to test the waters with something a little bit different.

Today’s review comes from The Roaming Dragon. As I’ve mentioned before Vancouver has a ‘booming’ food truck scene and my final review could have come from any number of places, there was Tacofino, which sold, well tacos obviously which many people had raved about and the ever elusive ‘Yolks Breakfast Company’ who I swear were never at the location they claimed to be each time I tried to visit. Eventually though, on my flinal morning, I plumped for The Roaming Dragon.

So with the intro done, let’s have some Van Scran fun!

Where: Corner of Robson St. and Burrard St.

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I had been curious to see just how the Asian influence, that was clearly prevalent throughout the city would translate to the food truck scene especially after two stonkingly good Asian inspired meals in a day (A Dim Sum brunch which included my first taste of BBQ chicken’s feet and a multi-plate Chinese sharer that opened my eyes to a whole new world of vegetarian cookery). Initially I had been drawn in by their online promise of Korean BBQ Tacos however I was more than a little disappointed to see that they were not on the menu come my arrival.

Where's my Korean BBQ Taco's?
Where’s my Korean BBQ Taco’s?

However never being one to turn down a good scran I scanned the available options. My eye was initially drawn to the Beef Rendang Poutine but my poutine experiences both at home and in Canada had been such a let down, despite the abundance of cheese and gravy they often provide, that I decided to play it relatively safe with a Chicken Noodle Box for CAD$12 (Approx. £6.75).

Chicken Noodle Box
Chicken Noodle Box

I was instantly glad I opted for the Chicken over the tofu, not because I dislike tofu (I actually think well done tofu can be quite tasty), but because as I started revving the engine on my chopstick fingers it became apparent that the Tofu option would have been exactly the same except without the addition of chicken on top.

First thing I noticed was that the portion was huge, I mean the picture probably doesn’t do justice to the depth of this box but it took me a good 15/20 minutes to eat it all. As well as the chicken the noodles were topped with chopped cashews and peanuts which added a lovely nuttiness that is so often attributed to South-East Asian cuisine. It was also garnished with fully sprouted bean sprouts, a pretty rare occurrence when Iv’e been out and about in the UK. These added a freshness and in the flavour stakes were certainly a ramped up version of the thin white bean sprouts commonly found at home with the leaves adding a slight peppery note. The chicken had been cooked separately and placed on top of the noodles bringing with it a slightly overbearing taste of white wine, initially fine but slowly building as I went. I know the flavour boost that a couple of dashes of shaoxing rice wine can bring to meat but this definitely focused more on the tartness of a white as opposed to the subtle hum of shaoxing or it’s commonly used western alternate sherry.

There is no doubt that the noodles were very tasty heady with soy and flashing hints of ginger, garlic and five spice. The use of fine egg noodles was particularly pleasing for this guy as I think these are the best type to use when it comes to any kind of stir fry dish. The noodles were also dense with vegetables, a concoction of carrots, spring onions and highly-flavoured shitake mushrooms with little pockets of broccoli poking through every so often. The tofu had been stir-fried just long enough to give a crisp texture to a couple of the sides on each small cube whilst still remaining soft enough to eat.

For me though the real skill in this food truck dish was the use of the chopped nuts and fresh bean sprouts adding another dimension to what was a very good, if not a bit safe, chicken noodle dish. If somebody was to offer me it again I wouldn’t turn my nose up at it, although at the same time I wouldn’t rush to ask for the same again.

VanScran Rating: 7/10. Solid.

And so with that this wee adventure ends. Vancouver is a lovely city and if you are super energetic and have acquired a taste for artisan microbrews then there isn’t really anywhere else you should be looking to be.

Until next time, Find a Van. Eat Some Scran!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. He has contributed to prominent football sites including Pie & Bovril, The Terrace Podcast, The Football Pink and The FBA’s as well as featuring in The Scotsman, STV and a number of other media outlets. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ with a passion for food that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

The VanCan ScranVan Diaries: Japadog

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After a couple of hours at the Rogers Arena watching a free-to-all Vancouver Canucks training session I had decided to embark on journey two of the VanCan ScranVan Diaries, there was a slight problem though. It was absolutely belting it down and I, being Scottish, was woefully under-prepared for bad weather on my holidays and as such the prospect of wandering the streets and getting a good drenching for my troubles wasn’t really revving my engine and it was at this point I remembered the stories I’d been told of Japadog.

As the name, suggests, a Japanese themed hot dog truck that now had a fully enclosed shop somewhere in Downtown Vancouver, I could get the ScranVan experience whilst not running the risk of pneumonia.

So with the intro done, let’s have some Van Scran fun!

Where: Static location in Robson Street with other carts and vans available.

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On entering I was greeted with the kind of scene you would expect to be greeted with in the bustling market of east Asia. A wall splattered with brightly coloured descriptions of food all lit up and laminated whilst the accommodation consisted of a smattering of small tables, after assessing the situation I realised I was a bit phased by the menu.

Would you like fish with your hot dog?
Would you like fish with your hot dog?

The general theme seemed to be a hot dog of some variety topped with some kind of fishiness, whether that be seaweed or bonito flakes. One of the boards on the walls championed the ‘Kurobuta Terimayo’ as the their number one best seller and so never one to shirk a food related challenge I placed my order, making it a combo deal with a portion of sachimi & garlic ‘shaked’ fries and a bottle of water. Due to the mental way bills are calculated in Canada, where bits and bobs of tax are tacked on afterwards, my order cost a rounded down CAD$10.10, (£5.75).

A Kurobuta Terimayo Hot Dog with teriyaki sauce, fried onions, terimayo and crispy seaweed with a side order of sachimi & garlic 'shaked' fries.
A Kurobuta Terimayo Hot Dog with teriyaki sauce, fried onions, terimayo and crispy seaweed with a side order of sachimi & garlic ‘shaked’ fries.

The first thing I noticed was that it didn’t smell like a hot dog but more pungent of the sea thanks to with the shredded seaweed topping, it was pretty off-putting to be honest but never the less I took my first bite.

Frankly it was all just a bit weird. Looking at the main event first let’s start with the positives, the dog itself was nice. It was billed as ‘Berkshire Pork’, but not really knowing what that is the closest comparison I can come with up is that of a Polish kielbasa, salty with a firm texture and an outer casing that popped when bitten for the first time. The bun was a little over toasted but was nice and soft without being stodgy but is at this point the positives end. The teriyaki sauce and terimayo were a strange combination, contrasting instead of complimenting each other. A good teriyaki sauce is a joy to behold but a bad one, oh boy, a bad one is like somebody has dispersed napalm onto your taste buds, this sauce was more napalm than joy and almost had a plasticky mass produced feel to it. The onions were fried but quite greasy and the seaweed apart from adding the smell of the coast added nothing to the overall taste. I ate it all but by the end I had decided I didn’t really like it.

It wasn’t all bad though, the sachimi & garlic ‘shaked’ fries were fairly tasty. The ‘shaked’ name apparently linked to the method of preparation where a portion of skinny fries are thrown into a brown paper bag along with the requested spices upon which the cook closes the bag and gives it a good shake. They were pleasant but paled in comparison with some of the cajun fries that do the rounds in burger joints back in Glasgow.

I left Japadog thinking that this was a gimmick that just didn’t work. I had been told stories of hour-long queues during the Vancouver Winter Olympics so there clearly is a cult following for the product but for me it was a disappointing take on the often glorious hot dog.

If somebody ever asks, ‘Would you like your hot dog with or without an array of ill-fitting Asian ingredients?’, politely say ‘without’ and ask about the fries instead.

VanScran Rating: 5/10 (3 of which were for the fries)

This was my second disappointing ‘new’ food experience in a few days. I had spent the weekend in Whistler and had my first ever Caesar. A drink made with Vodka, Celery, Celery Salt, Worcestershire Sauce, Tabasco, Lime and Clamato Juice which, as the name suggests, is a combination of clam and tomato juices.

A Clamato.
A Caesar.

Garnished with a rim of salt and pepper it was a strangely hot and pickly mixture that started with promise before building to a crescendo of flavour that confused your palate so much that you felt compelled to almost instantaneously take another sip only to then curse that decision seconds later. All the components were there for this to be a taste sensation so I may give it another bash before I leave but as it is…

Until next time, Find a Van. Eat Some Scran!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. He has contributed to prominent football sites including Pie & Bovril, The Terrace Podcast, The Football Pink and The FBA’s as well as featuring in The Scotsman, STV and a number of other media outlets. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ with a passion for food that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

The VanCan ScranVan Diaries: The Fat Duck Mobile Eatery Ltd.

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As I mentioned in my last entry I’m currently spending some good times with friends in Vancouver and as such my life of pie has taken a slight detour while I recharge my batteries and figure out exactly where I want my life to go next but I’m not going to bore you with that…instead I’m going to bore you entertain you with my tales of the best that Vancouver’s Food Trucks have to offer.

The idea to do this was actually floated to me by my host a couple of months ago, advising me that native Vancouverites (Is that right?) pride themselves on their culinary diversity and quality and that the food truck scene is something not to be missed. At the time I hadn’t really given it much thought, in fact it wasn’t really until last night that the conversation cropped up again but as I woke up this morning with no real clear plan it dawned on me to download the ‘Street Food Vancouver’ app and have a proper look. Imagine then my joy as 27 locations popped up open for business. The die had been cast and I would grab some lunch and then see where the day would take me.

Before I get started as followers of Meat Filled Pastries will tell you it is usually at this juncture that I will roll out the tried and trusted phrase of, “Without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!”, however since pies are not necessarily the order of the day it would be remiss of me not to pull another literary gem out of the bag.

So, with the intro done, let’s have some Van Scran fun! (That’s rubbish, innit?)

Where: Corner of W Cordova St. & Howe St. The Fat Duck Mobile Eatery Ltd.

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I had decided to head to the Downtown district of Vancouver for my first food truck foray, partly on the recommendation of my hosts but also because that was where all the arrows were pointing me too on the app. Initially I was going to start my journey blind heading towards which ever venue appeared first but knowing my mass indecision when it comes to food (I will pretty much try anything once), I thought it would be better to put a bit of planning into this maiden voyage and so the decision to visit the Fat Duck Mobile Eatery Ltd. was made helped by the fact that on hitting a click-through on the app a menu was provided.

The Menu
The Menu

My eye was immediately drawn to the Duck Confit ‘Philly’ Style. A rift, I assumed, on the classic Philly Cheese Steak. At CAD$10 (Approx. £5.50) it looked an absolute bargain and so I placed my order ignoring the tempting allure of something called a ‘Dirty Bowl’ whilst also trying not to giggle like a school girl while the young fellow in front of me asked if the woman behind the counter’s Dirty Bowl was spicy. I’m such a child!

As part of the ordering process I had to make up a name for myself as over the last few days it has become apparent that the Canadian ear seems to struggle with somebody saying ‘Chris’ in a strong Glaswegian accent and so ‘Marshall’ (These may get more intricate as the week goes on) awaited his order. When it arrived in its large boxed container it smelt amazing and on opening I wasn’t disappointed. The saliva glands were working overtime and I walked away looking for a place to devour my scran.

Duck Confit 'Philly' Style with Marinated Mushrooms,  Pickled Onions, Swiss Cheese, Scallions (Spring Onions to you and me) and Parmesan Mayo, with Chips (Crisps) and Chilli Mayo
Duck Confit ‘Philly’ Style with Marinated Mushrooms, Pickled Onions, Swiss Cheese, Scallions (Spring Onions to you and me) and Parmesan Mayo, with Chips (Crisps) and Chilli Mayo

My initial thought was to stroll along to Canada Place, a long pier just off the city centre, however as soon as I sat down a seagull the size of a Shetland Pony promptly sat itself down beside me and so I relocated to a less coastal location in the hope of eating my lunch in peace. As I hope the picture shows this was bursting to the crusts with meat and veggie goodness, served on a ciabatta bun I was concerned that any bite I took would end in disaster due to the occasionally chewy nature of this bread but luckily my bite was masterful as always and a couple of chews later and the party had started!

The first thing that struck me was how well the duck had been confit and the fact that there was very little fat amongst the meat, it was seasoned well and was speckled with lovely dark crispy bits throughout that added a deeper duck flavour. Next up on the palate was the wonderfully sweet and tangy pickled onions, using red instead of standard white onions should be considered a masterstroke as the sweetness complimented the duck superbly and the fresh scallions added a bit of additional crunch and a fresh, but light, onion back note to the sandwich. The marinated mushrooms added extra bite and pleasingly tasted of mushrooms. That may sound daft but an overcooked mushroom is a travesty to food, my only problem here is that as I write this a few hours later I am unable to pinpoint the marinade used.

The final part of this sandwich, and perhaps the most interesting to me, was the addition of the Swiss cheese and parmesan mayo. My natural instinct was to dismiss duck and cheese as a combination too far but I was sorely mistaken. The mild Swiss cheese melded really well with the tender pulled apart duck just melting and adding a smothness to the rich meat whilst the parmesan mayo added a salty seasoning to the entire thing that I really enjoyed.

The crisps were nicely baked and seasoned whilst the chilli mayo was a pleasant accompaniment, smoky with a mild heat but the sandwich was clearly the star of the show, if everything from a Vancouver Food Truck tastes as good as this you’re going to have a very happy pie man.

VanScran Rating: 8/10

I’d love to get some feedback on this, much like the first ever pie review this was an idea after the event so there will be some things getting changed for next time anyway. Although this is slightly outside my comfort zone in terms of writing it’s something I’ve always wanted to give a bash so we’ll see how it goes, until next time….

Find a Van. Eat Some Scran! (That’s better)

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. He has contributed to prominent football sites including Pie & Bovril, The Terrace Podcast, The Football Pink and The FBA’s as well as featuring in The Scotsman, STV and a number of other media outlets. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ with a passion for food that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

 

Pie 94: The Largs Thistle ‘Steak & Gravy’ Pie

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Hello! I’d actually wrote this review in Glasgow Airport as I waited to start my journey to Canada’s Pacific coast but unfortunately, as does happen when you spend a lot of time writing, I managed to make the most rookie of errors and not save it. So now a day a couple of days into my Vancouver adventure I’ve suitably shaken off the travelling cobwebs to go again this time with a more pictureseque view on the balcony of my friend’s apartment with a couple of slices of toast for company before embarking on today’s adventures.

As part of any trip I go on I’m always keen to see what level of football is on show, not just on the pitch but for those that attend the games as well. Last night, I went to see the Vancouver Whitecaps and got to sample my first taste of the MLS. That, along with my experiences of watching an FA Cup Quarter Final Replay in Downtown Vancouver will form the basis of another piece of writing focused on football fandom in North America that I will get to at some point over the coming week.

As it is, I still had time for one more pie before departure, so without much further ado, let’s rate some pie!

THE SURROUNDINGS

Where: Barrfields Park, Largs Thistle 1-2 Pollok, West Superleague First Division

Always enjoy a bit of pie marketing
Always enjoy a bit of pie marketing

Price: A pure breed luxury steak pie this was a relative bargain at £1.50, although it would be remiss to not acknowledge that a traditional scotch pie from the same venue would cost you 50p less. Still though £1.50 for a steak pie not to be sniffed at.

Presentation: For a while now I have spoken about the popular convention that steak pies are placed in tin foil sheaths to either help (or hinder) the consumption of a pie that tends to be more plentiful in gravy than a scotch version, recently though, this seems to have changed for on review my last 3 steak pie reviews have all been sheathless and for that I am glad. Why so? Surely the description of just a medium-sized white napkin would bore us all to tears? I hear you cry. Well potentially yes, but, over the last couple of weeks I have been well and truly stung not once, but twice by the sticky bottomed mess that a tin foil container creates when eating a pie (Note: Both these pies came from Hampden). At least if I make a mess then it’s my mess and not as a result of a slapdash approach to filling and baking a steak pie. So yeah mediums-sized white napkin, good work!

THE PIE

Steak & Bake!
Steak & Bake!

Meatiness: This my friends was an absolute meaty triumph. Firstly, despite it’s rather squat looking appearance, this was an incredibly well filled pie. The meat was soft and tender but had enough of a bite to keep your gnashers interested. It was seasoned to almost near perfection, full of umami although there was no peppery kick. The gravy was flowing in abundance and although a tin foil case would have helped to catch any drips caused by too greedy a bite, the juggling was worth it to make sure you captured every morsel. Top pie work going on here.

Pastry: The pastry was lovely and golden all around. The puffy top was flaky and playfully danced along your lips as you took a bite whilst the sides and bottoms were sturdy enough to cope with the meaty voluptuousnous within. If I was being hyper-critical the base was ever so slightly underdone, but that is of negligible consideration when assessing the grandeur of this pie.

Brown Sauce: Steak Pie. No Sauce.

Overall: Great and generous filling with pastry cooked to near perfection, they were championing this pie as something great before purchase and it certainly didn’t disappoint.

Gravy Factor: Aw’ the Gravy!

That was rather good. It won’t surprise you to hear that I was unable to obtain a pastry based good at BC Place and the hot dog, whilst huge, just wasn’t quite the same as the warm embrace that only a pie provides. My next pie will be from…well I’m not sure where but I’m sure it’ll be a goody. Keep an eye out for my North American Soccer Review but until next time go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. He has contributed to prominent football sites including Pie & Bovril, The Terrace Podcast, The Football Pink and The FBA’s as well as featuring in The Scotsman, STV and a number of other media outlets. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ with a passion for food that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.

 

Pie 93: The Rossvale Bridie

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The worrying thing about the prospect of writing a book is that there is a lot of words involved. I’ve never really thought about it but since this little venture started with Pie 12: The Rob Roy Pie I reckon I’ve probably managed over 75,000 words dedicated to pie whilst championing football’s cause across all levels, mainly junior but with more than a nod to the senior and ladies game. There’s even a couple of pies from across the globe…well England but you get my point.

Along with all the peripheries that this journey has brought me that’s some achievement but it’s beginning to dawn on me that amalgamating all these tales of pastry themed whimsy is going to take all my accumulative nous not to end up with a soggy bottomed mess of pie all over the pages. The premise will be simple, it’ll be about pies and the journey of discovery that has taken me across the country whilst reflecting on some of the more bizarre things that have happened along the way. Will this be my pastry zenith? Only time will tell.

As it stands though we need to reach that magic hundred and leading on from, Pie 88: The Spartans ‘Haggis & Neeps’ Pasty, there is another non-pie based pastry snack on the way from Rossvale.

So without much further ado let’s rate some pie! I mean, bridie.

THE SURROUNDINGS

Where: Petershill Park, Rossvale 0-2 Pollok, Central League Cup 2nd Round

You could almost kid yourself on this was Summer.
You could almost kid yourself on this was Summer.

Price: £1.50. The same price as the previously reviewed scotch pie offering from the same venue, more than the single golden nuggets I’ve had to part with in previous weeks but still nothing to be sniffed at.

Presentation: It was one of those half and half paper and plastic bags which the bridie was wrapped into as tightly as possible. There was a small napkin dispenser at the counter but thanks to a bumper crowd there was but one dangling in the wind from it by the time I arrived twenty minutes in. When I started reviewing my pastries this kind of shortfall would annoy me but as I learned about the clubs and how they were run I understood the fine balance those at the very bottom of the game have to find between maximum profitability and the need to avoid a loss. Maybe ‘bigger’ clubs should be better at sharing knowledge in this respect rather than turning up and having a moan. Just a thought.

THE PIE

Well Bridie...
Well Bridie…

Meatiness: The reason I prefer a pie to most other pastry snacks is that the ratios usually always work to the benefit of carnivores everywhere with the pastry acting as supporting cast to the meaty main event. In a bridie the balance isn’t quite the same, I’ll come onto the pastry in a bit but it’s important at this juncture to highlight that to get to this bridie’s core you had to chomp through layer upon layer of pastry. Once there you were greeted with a well seasoned and moist oniony mince parcel, it was just rather small.

Pastry: As I have just highlighted there was an abundance of pastry to be had with this football snack. It was beautifully golden and flaked away well, it was consistent all the way round and had just a few layers of softer pastry underneath the initial crispness that eased you into a bite of meaty goodness further in. Due to a lack of pies, a number of my fellow fans had opted for a bridie and could be audibly heard singing the praises of this pastry surround.

Brown Sauce: Much like a pasty to add sauce to a bridie is an invitation for an ever flowing waterfall of brown sauce flavoured goodness ending on the floor around you with no obvious pool for it to lie in. No sauce here.

Overall: A tasty meat filled pastry, heavy on the pastry and perhaps a little light on the filling.

Gravy Factor: Sometimes I like to get a hunk of bread and sook up all the gravy with it. There just wasn’t enough gravy here this time.

Number 93 is in the books. Thanks to the wonders of modern-day Retail I currently have a Washing Machine scheduled to arrive at my flat sometime between 11-3 on a Saturday! I mean really!? Hopefully I can get that fixed and will be reviewing a luxury pie from Largs Thistle.

However until, next time, go forth and eat pie!

Chris Marshall, is a BJTC accredited Radio Journalist with an honours degree in Communications & Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University. He has contributed to prominent football sites including Pie & Bovril, The Terrace Podcast, The Football Pink and The FBA’s as well as featuring in The Scotsman, STV and a number of other media outlets. A perennial ‘Scottish Sporting Optimist’ with a passion for food that has manifest itself in the wonder that is Meat Filled Pastries.